American children's periodicals, 1789-1872
introduction
by title by place by editor by publisher by subject not listed covers
1789-1820 1821-1840 1841-1860 1861-1872
American children’s periodicals, 1861-1872

[NOTES: Unless noted, page size is the size when trimmed, usually for binding; page size is approximate. Page size is described as height by width, thus: [measurement in inches]″ h x [measurement in inches]″ w

about frequency: semimonthly: twice a month (usually 24 issues per year); biweekly: every other week (usually 26 issues per year); bimonthly: every other month (usually 6 issues per year)

about availability: selections or complete issues available for free on the Internet, or available at libraries on microform or in databases

abbreviations:

APS, American Periodical Series (microfilm)

AAS, American Antiquarian Society, MA

AASHistper, American Antiquarian Society Historical Periodicals (digital database; series 1-5)

Batsel, Union List of United Methodist Serials, 1773-1973, comp. John D. Batsel and Lyda K. Batsel (Evanston, IL: n. p., 1974)

NUC, National Union Catalog

OCLC, database available at many institutions via WorldCat (information may also be available in the NUC)

ULS, Union List of Serials in Libraries of the United States and Canada, ed. Winifred Gregory (New York, NY: H. W. Wilson Co., 1927)]

Our Paper ; 1861

cover/masthead: 1861

edited by: John D. Henderson?

published: New Orleans, LA

frequency: semimonthly

description: 4 pp.; price, 12″ h; price, 2¢/ copy

• vol 1 #14 is Dec 1861

• Religious focus

relevant information: Printed at the Magic Press, Book and Job Printing Office, 73 Poydras St.

source of information: AASHistPer, series 4; AAS

available: AASHistPer, series 4

Young Folks’ Monitor, and The World We Live In ; April 1861-

edited by: R. M. Mansur

published: Mount Vernon, ME: R. M. Mansur.

• AAS has: Boston, MA: S. Hawes. AAS copy is June 1861

frequency: monthly

description: Newspaper format • Price, 33¢/ year

relevant information: The Monitor apparently began as the Glenwood Valley Times (1855-1861); Rowell says that it was “enlarged… into a small quarto” that lasted a year.

relevant quote: “THE YOUNG FOLKS’ MONITOR. This is the title of a little paper devoted to the cause of temperance and the moral culture of youth, to be issued by our friend R. M. Mansur, esq., of Mt. Vernon. It will be published monthly, at the low rate of 33 cents per year, and we hope it will receive a liberal support.” [“The Young Folks’ Monitor.” Maine Farmer 29 (28 March 1861): 2]

continues: the Glenwood Valley [Maine] Times

continued by: The Musical Monitor (for adults)

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; Rowell; Maine Farmer

available: AASHistPer, series 4

bibliography:

• “The Young Folks’ Monitor.” Maine Farmer 29 (28 March 1861): 2.

• E. Rowell. “The Press of Kennebec County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; p. 99-100. [archive.org]

The Sunday School Paper for the South ; May 1861-April 1862?

published: Charleston, SC: South Carolina Sunday School Union, 1861-1862?; printed by R. M. Stokes, 1861; printed by James Phynney, April 1862

frequency: monthly (irregular)

description: April 1862, 4 pp.

• Religious focus

source of information: Kennerly

bibliography:

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

The Portfolio ; June-Sept 1861

edited by: Samuel L. Hammond; Frederick W. Miller

published: Charleston, SC: Samuel L. Hammond, 1861

frequency: monthly

description: $1/ year

source of information: Kennerly

bibliography:

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

The Deaf Mute Casket ; 1? Oct 1861-1 April 1865

edited by: Willie J. Palmer

published: Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind, Oct 1861-1 April 1865; published by the deaf pupils

frequency: Oct 1861-Oct 1864, semimonthly during school term; Nov 1864-1 April 1865, monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 15.75″ h x 11″ w • Prices: 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10 copies, $4/ year

relevant quote: “The Casket is published … by the Deaf mute pupils of the Institution. The publication of such a paper, was not commenced with the expectation that [it] would prove a source of profit, but Printing being one of the mechanical branches selected by the Board of Directors to be taught the pupils, it was deemed necessary to issue some publication of the kind …. With the current receipts from Job work, it is expected that the Printing department will defray its own expenses, and at the same time give the unfortunate mutes a good trade, which will enable them, when they have finished their education, to earn an honest living, and become good and useful citizens.” [2 (1 April 1862): editorial page; in Kennerly, p. 424]

source of information: Kennerly

bibliography:

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

The Child’s World ; 1862-1880 • Youth’s World ; Jan 1881-after 1884

cover/masthead: 1864 | 1865 | 1866 | Jan-April 1868 | Sept 1868-Feb 1869, 1871

edited by: 1868-1878, Richard Newton • 1879-1884, Edwin W. Rice

published: Philadelphia, PA: American Sunday School Union; publisher at 1122 Chestnut St. • New York, NY: American Sunday-School Union; 1864-1869, publisher at 599 Broadway; 1871, publisher at 10 Bible House, Astor Place.

frequency: monthly & semimonthly editions; 1 vol/ year

description: 1864-1871: 8 pp.; page size, 13″ h x 9.5″ w. Prices: monthly ed., 10 copies, $1.20/ year; 20 copies, $2.40/ year; 50 copies, $6/ year; 75 copies, $9/ year; 100 copies, $12/ year. Semimonthly ed., 10 copies, $2.40/ year; 20 copies, $4.80/ year; 50 copies, $12/ year; 75 copies, $18/ year; 100 copies, $24/ year

• Circulation: 1869 & 1870, 300,000

• Religious focus

• Perhaps because the World was a continuation of the Sunday-School Banner and The Youth’s Sunday-School Gazette (11 Jan 1843-1861), it was treated as a new series, with both the old and new volume numbers printed on the masthead.

• Each issue of the semimonthly edition is dated only with month and year; thus, vol 23 #17 and vol 23 #18 are both dated Sept 1866.

• In 1867, the masthead was changed: “On the first of the year 1867, we shall present the readers of THE CHILD’S WORLD with a very attractive sheet. We have had a new head engraved on purpose for it, and a new fount [sic] of type will be used for printing it ….” [23 #14 (Dec 1866): 3]

relevant quote: At the end of 1864, the editor pointed out, “It is now twenty-two years since we began to publish a paper for children and youth. Since that time a great many such papers have been started, and some of them continue to this day. We are very glad that so many people are at work to please the taste and improve the minds of our young friends. Those who read the early volumes of our paper, are now men and women grown up, with children of their own to care for ….” [21 #24 (Dec 1864): 4]

continues: Youth’s Penny Gazette • The Youth’s Sunday-School Gazette (also The Youth’s Sunday School Gazette) (11 Jan 1843-1861) • Sunday-School Banner (Jan 1859-Dec 1861)

source of information: 1864-1869, 1871, scattered issues in bound vol; AAS catalog; OCLC; Scharf

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

bibliography:

• Advertisement. The Danville Quarterly Review 1 (Dec 1861): 3.

• Advertisement. The Independent 14 (2 Jan 1862): 5.

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 33 (8 Jan 1863): 5.

• Advertisement. Reformed Church Messenger 33 (15 Jan 1868): 5.

• Advertisement. Reformed Church Messenger 34 (7 Jan 1869): 8.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; pp. 75, 99. [archive.org]

• Advertisement. American Literary Gazette and publishers’s Circular 14 (1 Jan 1870); 120.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

• Advertisement. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’s Circular 16 (2 Jan 1871): 83.

• Advertisement. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’s Circular 18 (15 Jan 1872): 109.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 160. [archive.org]

• Advertisement. Christian Union 20 (17 Dec 1879): 539.

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, PA: L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 2014. [google books]

Monthly Voice ; 1862-April 1864

edited by: M. L. Wilson

published: Newark, OH: General Church of the New Jerusalem

frequency: monthly

source of information: AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 4

Young People’s Helper (also Young People’s Helper and Temperance Visitor) ; 1862-after Jan 1872

cover/masthead: 1872

published: Rockland, ME: Z. Pope Vose, 1870.

• Portland, ME: Z. Pope Vose, 1871.

• Portland, ME: Rich & Vose, 1872; publisher at 74 Middle St..

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1871: 16 pp.; page size, 11.75″ h; price, 50¢/ year

• 1872: 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8″ h x 5.75″ w; price, $1 /year in advance; postage, 12¢/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 6,500

relevant quotes:

• Advertisements in 1870 promised a wide variety of material: “Stories, music, poetry, dialogues, puzzles, etc., in every number.” [advertisement. Herald of Health. 17 (April 1871): 189]

• In Jan 1872, the Helper had a new format: “We present to our readers the first number of the Helper in its new and improved magazine form, and trust that it will commend itself to their approbation and elicit their hearty support. … As a home magazine for boys and girls we hope it will universally please the young people, and obtain the approbation of their elders. As a school magazine we hope it will commend itself to the approval and support of both teachers and pupils.” [10 (Jan 1872): 30]

relevant information: A story from the magazine was reprinted in the Maine Farmer in 1872. [“Harry’s New Leaf.” Maine Farmer 40 (6 April 1872): 4.

source of information: Jan 1872 issue; Herald of Health ; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. Herald of Health. 17 (April 1871): 189.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 68. [archive.org]

• Edwin Sprague and W. H. Twombly. “The Press of Knox County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; p. 195. [archive.org]

The Children’s Friend ; Aug 1862-June 1915

cover/masthead: 1867-1868

edited by: 1863, William Brown • 1867-1872, 1896, E. T. Baird

• OCLC lists J. K. Hazen

published: Richmond, VA: Presbyterian Committee on Publication, 1862-1878; publisher 1101 Main St., 1867-1868.

• Richard, VA: Presbyterian Committe on Publication, in conjunction with the Reformed Church, 1878-1915.

frequency: 1862, monthly • 1 Jan 1864-, semimonthly • 1867-1872, semimonthly & monthly

description: 4 pp.; folio; price, 30¢/ copy

• 1862: price, 40¢/ year, “in packages” • circulation for first issue: 2,274

• 1867: page size, 14.5″ h x 10.5″ w; price, 30¢/ year, “in packages” • 1868: page size, 14.5″ h x 10.5″ w; price: 1 copy, semimonthly, 50¢/year; monthly, 25¢/ year. 8 copies, semimonthly, $2/ year; monthly, $1/ year. Price was lowered in 1867

• 1867-1868: “An Evangelical Sabbath School Journal”

• 1869-1872: page size, size 20″ h x 15″ w. Prices: semimonthly, 50¢, monthly, 25¢

• Circulation, 1870, 23,500

• Vol 1-2 (Aug 1862-1864); new series vol 1-51 (1866-June 1915)

relevant quote: The Friend’s beginnings were complicated: “Through the kindness of a friend, we have received a copy of the ‘Minutes of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America, A. D. 1862,’ printed at Augusta, Georgia, which Assembly, it is stated in the first day’s minute, ‘in view of the presence of the conflicting armies in the near vicinity of the city of Memphis, and the consequent danger and difficulty of assembling at that place, met, … in the Presbyterian Church in the city of Montgomery …. The Committee of Publication reported that they had not, for some time past, secured the attendance of a quorum, three of the members residing in Richmond, having been called into the army. Arrangements had been made with the Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in Nashville, to publish a Sabbath school paper for their use; but this plan was frustrated, say the Committee ‘by the political misfortune befalling that city.’ They proposed to issue in May a children’s paper, from Richmond, Virginia, to be called the Children’s Friend, lamenting, however, that only 2,274 copies have been subscribed for. The entire receipts of the Committee had been $5,132.” [“The Southern (O. S.) Assembly.” New York Evangelist 32 (20 Nov 1862): 6]

absorbed by: Onward

source of information: Dec 1867-1868 scattered issues; Kennerly; Kelly; OCLC; NUC; Rowell;

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The Southern (O. S.) Assembly.” New York Evangelist 32 (20 Nov 1862): 6.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 111. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 750. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 181. [archive.org]

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Child’s Index ; Sept 1862, Jan 1863-April 1865 • Child’s Delight ; 1866-1869?

edited by: 1862, 1863-1865, Samuel Boykin

published: Macon, GA: Samuel Boykin, Jan 1863-April 1865. Macon, GA: n. p., 1866.

frequency: 1863-1865, monthly • 1866, semimonthly

description: 4 pp.; newspaper format

• Circulation: March 1863, 4,000-5,000

• Sept 1862 issue is specimen issue

• Aug 1864 issue misnumbered Vol 2 #7

• Religious focus: Baptist

interesting information: The July 1863 issue contains a short story by 15-year-old Joel Chandler Harris. [Flanders; p. 133]

source of information: Kennerly; Flanders; OCLC

available: excerpts of Index in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

bibliography:

• Bertram Holland Flanders. Early Georgia Magazines. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1944; p. 133.

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Little American ; 1 Oct 1862-1864

edited by: Susan Warner; Anna Warner

published: Hudson, NY: George W. Frary, 1 Oct 1862-. Also, Rhinecliff, NY: George W. Frary, 1862. West Point, NY: George W. Frary, 1863.

frequency: semimonthly

description: 8 pp.; price, $1.50/ year

• No issues for 15 July 1864 or 1 Aug 1864

• 1865 issues were to be monthly; 12 pp.

• 22 issues total

relevant quote: In 1864, the editors announced, “We shall not go on unless we have what we think encouragement to do so.” [2 (1 Nov 1864): 164; in Lyon, p. 238]

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 4

• excerpt in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 236-238.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Der Lammerhirt ; 1863-

See Der Lämmer-Hirte

Little Joker ; 1863-1866

published: New York, NY

source of information: Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 4

bibliography:

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Sabbath School Gem ; 1863-1864, 1869-1873

edited by: James E. N. Backus & Lucy A. Backus

published: DeRuyter, NY: James E. N. Backus, 1863-1864. Port Leyden, NY: James E. N. Backus, 1869. Scott, NY: James E. N. Backus, 1870. Albion, WI: James E. N. Backus, 1871-1873.

frequency: 1869, monthly • 1870-1873, semimonthly

description: 1869: 4 pp.; page size 24″ h x 17″ w; price, 30¢/ year

• 1870: 4 pp.; page size 24″ h x 16″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• 1871-1873: 4 pp.; page size 22″ h x 16″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Circulation: 1871, 1,296; 1872, 1,296

• Religious focus: Seventh Day Baptist

relevant quotes: One advertisement declared that the Gem was “for Little Folks who Desire to be Good Folks.” [Rowell 1873; p. 370]

•Lucy Backus remembered the stresses of producing the paper: “I can surely sympathize with you in your undertaking, as I myself, in my younger days, assisted my husband in preparing copy for the Sabbath School Gem, a child’s paper for the Sabbath Schools of our denomination, and I know it is not always a pleasant task, for the weeks come around so regularly and the copy must be ready on time for the printer. I also know that it is a work of love for those who desire to do something for the dear Master.” [Backus]

source of information: Rowell; Hammond; Backus

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 80; copy online at UNT Digital Libraries

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 711. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 158; copy online at UNT Digital Libraries

• Mrs. L. M. Hammond. History of Madison County, State of New York. Syracuse, NY: Truair, Smith & Co., 1872; p. 278. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 183. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1873; p. 370; copy online at UNT Digital Libraries

Seventh Day Baptists in Europe and America. Plainfield, NJ: seventh Day Baptist General Conference, 1910; vol 1, p. 276. [google books]

• Letter from Lucy A. Backus. The Sabbath School Recorder 70 (6 March 1911): 307. [google books]

Sabbath School Star ; Feb 1863-after 1870

edited by: George L. Babington, 1870

published: St. Louis, MO: P. M. Pinckard, 1863-1869; publisher at 80 Pine (between 5th & 6th). • St. Louis, MO: South-western Book and Publishing Company, 1870; publisher at 510 & 512 Washington Ave.

frequency: 1863-1868, monthly; 1869-1870, semimonthly & monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 20″ h x 13″ w; prices: 1 copy, 30¢/ year; 100 copies, $24/ year

• Religious focus

source of information: Worldcat; Edwards; Rowell; Tanner

bibliography:

• Richard Edwards, editor. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1864. St. Louis, MO: Richard Edwards, 1864; pp. 79; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

•Richard Edwards, ed. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1865. St. Louis, MO: Richard Edwards, 1865; p. 119; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• Henry Tanner, comp. Directory & Shipper’s Guide of Kansas & Nebraska. Leavenworth City, KS: T. A. Holland & Co., 1866; p. 567. [google books]

• Richard Edwards, ed. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1866. St. Louis, MO: Richard Edwards, 1866; p. 89; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• Richard Edwards, ed. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1867. St. Louis, MO: Richard Edwards, 1867; p. 113; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1868. St. Louis, MO: Southern Publishing, 1868; p. 107; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• Richard Edwards, editor. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1869. St. Louis, Mo.: Richard Edwards, 1869; p. 79; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• Advertisement. Colman’s Rural World 22 (13 Feb 1869): 111.

Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1870. St. Louis, Mo.: Southern Publishing, 1870; p. 65; copy online at digital.wustle.edu

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 684. [google books]

• “Books, Magazines and Papers Received.” Advocate of Peace 2 (Oct 1870): 296.

Children’s Guide ; July 1863-Aug 1865

edited by: John W. Burke

published: Macon, GA: John W. Burke.

frequency: monthly: 1st day of month; 1 vol/ year

description: 4 pp.; page size, 11.75″ h. Prices: 1 copy, $1/ year; 10 copies, 70¢/ year

• Religious focus: Methodist

source of information: Kennerly; Batsel; NUC

bibliography:

• Bertram Holland Flanders. Early Georgia Magazines. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1944.

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

The Young Pilgrim ; Sept 1863-after 1925

cover/masthead: 1869

edited by: 1869-1872, William B. Herron

published: Boston, MA: Christian Publication Society, 1863. • Boston, MA: the Advent Christian Publication Society, 1869; publisher at 167 Hanover St.

frequency: Sept 1863-1 May 1864, monthly. 1 May 1864-Dec 1900, semimonthly. 1 Jan 1901-after 1925, weekly

description: 1869: 4 pp.; page size, 13.5″ h x 10″ w. Prices: 1-10 copies, 50¢/ year each; 10-49 copies, 40¢/year each; 50+ copies, 35¢/year each

• Vol 7 #24 is 18 Dec 1869

• Religious focus

source of information: Dec 1869 copy; AAS

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 665. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 74. [archive.org]

• Albert C. Johnson. Advent Christian History. Boston, MA: Advent Christian Publication Society, 1918; pp. 488-489, 494. [archive.org]

• Beulah May Bowden. “History of the Advent Christian Church.” MA Thesis. University of Wisconsin, 1920; pp. 163-164, 171-172. [google books]

N.W. Ayer & Son’s American Newspaper Annual and Directory. Philadelphia: N. W. Ayer & Sons, 1925; p. 456. [google books]

California Youths’ Companion ; 3 Dec 1864-27 Sept 1866

edited by: W. B. Ewer

published: San Francisco, CA: Smith & Edgar, 1864.

frequency: weekly

description: Vol 3 #12 is 20 April 1866

source of information: NUC; AAS

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

The Experiment: a Juvenile Monthly ; Jan 1864-

published: Philadelphia, PA: n. p.; printed by J. Richards

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 10.5″ h

source of information: OCLC; AAS catalog

The Youth’s Visitor ; Jan 1864-Oct 1872

edited by: Jan 1864-Jan 1865, R. Hutchinson • Feb 1865-Oct 1872, John M. Orrock

published: Boston, MA: the American Millenial Association; publisher with “branch office” in Rock Island, 1869. • Also published in Quebec, 1866-1872

frequency: 1 vol/ year • Jan 1864-Dec 1865, monthly

• Jan 1866-Dec 1868, semimonthly • Jan 1869-Oct 1872, monthly

description: 1869-1872, 4 pp.; page size, 20″ h x 15″ w; price, 25¢

relevant information: The Visitor accepted no advertisements.

source of information: OCLC; NUC; Rowell

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 666. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; pp. 75-76. [archive.org]

The School and Family Visitor ; 15 April-Sept 1864

edited by: W. N. Hailman

published: Louisville, KY

frequency: monthly

description: Price, $2/ year. page size, 8″ h

relevant quote: The Visitor was intended to be welcomed by a wide audience: “We have received the prospectus of ‘The School and Family Visitor,’ the first number of which will be issued on the 15th of April next, at Louisville, Ky. The Visitor is to be under the editorial charge of Prof. W. N. Hailman, of the Louisville High School. For the teacher, it will contain articles on the practical duties of his profession, educational intelligence, and reviews of books. To parents and children it will bring articles on home instruction, concise biographies, instructive anecdotes, stories, enigmas, etc. To all it will furnish interesting articles on science, art, and literature, with a current history of their progress. The establishment of an educational periodical in the ‘border state’ of Kentucky, is a sign of the times. In fact, one of the remarkable results of this war is found in the great activity which already prevails in the expansion of our educational system, and the aggressive movements of the common schools toward the far South.” [“Literary Notices.” American Educational Monthly 1 (April 1864): 127]

source of information: ULS; OCLC

bibliography:

• “Literary Notices.” American Educational Monthly 1 (April 1864): 127.

• “Educational Intelligence.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 17 (July 1864): 264.

Child’s Banner ; 1865

available: excerpt in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

bibliography:

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

The Sunday School Standard ; 1865?-

edited by: J. E. Gilbert

published: Buffalo, NY; published for the County Associations of Western New York

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 19.5″ h • Aug 1866 is vol 2 #8

• Religious focus

source of information: AAS catalog

The Young Evangelist ; 1865-1906?

published: St. Louis, MO: Christian Publishing.

frequency: weekly

description: Page size, 13.75″ h • 2 Feb 1902 is vol 27 #5 • Last issue listed in OCLC is March 1906 (vol 31 #3)

• Religious focus

source of information: OCLC

Missionary Visitor ; 1865-1895 • Children’s Visitor; 1896-1901

published: Dayton, OH: D. K. Flickinger

frequency: semimonthly; 1 vol/ year • 22 June 1878 is vol. 13, #24

description: Religious focus

absorbed by: The Children’s FriendFriend for Boys and Girls (Dayton, OH; 1854-1917)

source of information: Batsel; OCLC

Young Catholic’s Friend ; 1865-1880?

published: Chicago, IL: J. J. Kearney

frequency: monthly

description: Religious focus: Catholic

relevant information: Williams gives a possible end date of 1880; however, the Friend is not listed among the periodicals in the Chicago City Directory for 1868. [“Chicago Periodicals.” Prairie Farmer 39 (25 July 1868): 28.]

source of information: Scott; Williams

bibliography:

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois. N. p.: Franklin William Scott, 1910; p. 86. [archive.org]

• Kenny J. Williams. Prairie Voices: A Literary History of Chicago from the Frontier to 1893. Nashville, TN: Townsend Press, 1980; p. 409.

Our Young Folks ; Jan 1865-Dec 1873

cover/masthead: 1865-1867, winter | 1865-1867, spring | 1865-1867, summer | 1865-1867, autumn | 1868-1873

edited by: John Townsend Trowbridge; Abigail Dodge (“Gail Hamilton”); Lucy Larcom, 1865-1867

• John Townsend Trowbridge; Lucy Larcom, 1867-1873

published: Boston: Ticknor & Fields, Jan 1865-1868. Boston: Fields, Osgood & Co., 1869-1873.

• New York, NY: The American News Company, Jan 1865-Sept 1866.

• Philadelphia, PA: T. B. Pugh, Jan 1865-Sept 1866.

• Chicago, IL: John R. Walsh, Jan 1865. Chicago, IL: Western News Co., Sept 1866.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: Jan 1865, 80 pp.; Feb 1865, 72 pp.; March, April 1865, 68 pp.; May 1865, 64 pp.; June 1865, 68 pp.; July 1865-Dec 1872, 64 pp.

• Page size untrimmed, 8.75″ h x 6″ w • Price: 20¢/ issue; $2/ year

• Circulation: Dec 1867 (from magazine), 50,000; 1869 (from magazine), 76,543; 1869-1870 (from Rowell), 40,000; 1872 (from Rowell), 35,000

relevant quotes:

• The Dec 1873 issue of Our Young Folks holds no hint that the magazine was about to be absorbed by another periodical; in fact, it contains a description of stories and serials planned for 1874, when the periodical would have a new look: “We have the satisfaction to announce that ‘Our Young Folks’ will bid its readers a Happy New Year in an entirely new suit of beautiful type; and that there will be other improvements in the mechanical appearance of the magazine, to correspond with its more elegant dress.” [9 (Dec 1873): 764] Other plans included publication of “Fast Friends,” a serial by John Townsend Trowbridge, and something just for young readers: “For the special benefit of youngest readers, we shall next year carry out a novel plan which we have long had in contemplation. The little ones, we are sure, will be delighted with it; and friends who have had a peep at the design declare that it will be no less entertaining to all.” [9 (Dec 1873): 764]

• Subscribers probably learned of the magazine’s fate when St. Nicholas appeared in their post office boxes; it printed a note from John Townsend Trowbridge: “Through the courtesy of the conductor of St. Nicholas, I am enabled to say a few words to the readers of ‘Our Young Folks,’ in place of the many I should have wished to say in the last number of that lamented magazine, had it been known to be the last when it left the editorial hands. That number was sent to its readers in the full faith that all it promised them for the coming year was to be more than fulfilled. But it had scarcely gone forth, when came the sudden change by which ‘Our Young Folks’ ceased to exist—the result of a purely commercial transaction, wholly justifiable, I think, on the part of the publishers, J. R. Osgood and Company, of whose honorable and liberal conduct in all that related to the little magazine, up to the very last, I can speak with the better grace now that my editorial connection with their house has ceased. … The serial story, prepared for the late magazine, is herewith transferred to St. Nicholas ….” [“A Card from the Editor of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” St. Nicholas. 1 (Jan 1874): 160]

• A few months after its demise, Our Young Folks was ranked by readers as “the best of modern American juvenile magazines” in an unscientific poll reported by The Literary World. [5 (1 Aug 1874): 45]

absorbed by: St. Nicholas ; Nov 1873-Feb 1940, 1943

source of information: Jan 1865, Sept-Oct 1866 issues, 1873 scattered issues; 1865-1872 bound volumes; St. Nicholas; Lyon; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

• APS III (1850-1900), reel 65-66

• excerpts in Yesterday’s Children, ed. John Morton Blum. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press, 1959.

• excerpts in Companions of Our Youth: Stories by Women for Young People’s Magazines, 1865-1900, ed. Jane Benardete and Phyllis Moe. NY: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., 1980.

• excerpts in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

excerpts online

bibliography:

• “ ‘Our Young Folks’—A Welcome Announcement.” Urbana [Illinois] Union 23 Nov 1864: 2.

• “Notes on Books and Booksellers: English Appreciation of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 7 (15 Sept 1866): 219.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 37.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 666. [google books]

Wentworth’s Boston Commercial Directory for 1871. Boston: Wentworth & Co., 1870; p. 119. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• John Townsend Trowbridge. “A Card from the Editor of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” St. Nicholas. 1 (Jan 1874): 160.

• comment on demise. The Literary World 5 (1 June 1874): 15.

• young readers rate. The Literary World 5 (1 Aug 1874): 45.

• Frank Luther Mott. A History of American Magazines: vol 3, 1865-1885. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1938. pp. 175.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (January/February 1939): 55-60.

• Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941); p. 133.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 271-276.

• Alice M. Jordan. “ ‘Our Young Folks’: Its Editors and Authors.” In From Rollo to Tom Sawyer, and Other Papers. Boston: The Horn Book, Inc., 1948.

• John Morton Blum, ed. Yesterday’s Children. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press, 1959.

• R. Gordon Kelly. Mother was a Lady. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1974.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 146.

• James Marten. “For the Good, the True, and the Beautiful: Northern Children’s Magazines and the Civil War.” Civil War History 41 (March 1995): 57-75.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

• Brandy Parris. “Difficult Sympathy in the Reconstruction-Era Animal Stories of Our Young Folks.” Children’s Literature, 31 (2003): 25-49.

• Lorinda B. Cohoon. “Necessary Badness: Reconstructing Postbellum Boyhood Citizenships in Our Young Folks and The Story of a Bad Boy,” in Serialized Citizenships: Periodicals, Books, and American Boys, 1840-1911. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 2006; pp. 89-118.

The Little Sower ; Jan 1865-after April 1877

edited by: William Worth Dowling

published: Indianapolis, IN: William Worth Dowling.

frequency: 1869-1870, weekly; 1872, monthly

description: 1869-1870, 8 pp. 1872, 32 pp.

• Page size, 10″ h x 7″ w

• Price: 1869, $1/ year; 1870, $1.25/ year; 1872, $1/ year

• Circulation: 1869, 22,000; 1870, 29,000; 1872, 36,000

• Religious focus

continued by: Sunday School Evangelist

source of information: American Phrenological Journal ; Phrenological Journal ; OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

bibliography:

• Notice. American Phrenological Journal 49 (April 1869): 165.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 28. [archive.org]

• Notice. The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 50 (March 1870): 223.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 644. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 44. [archive.org]

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 48 (12 April 1877): 5.

The Little Corporal ; July 1865-April 1875

cover/masthead: 1865-1866 | 1869 | early 1870 | July 1870-Oct 1871, Dec 1871 | Nov 1871 | 1872-1873

edited by: July 1865-June 1871, Alfred L. Sewell

• June 1866-Feb 1867, Edward Eggleston, associate ed.

• Aug 1867-1873, Emily Huntington Miller

published: Chicago, IL: Alfred L. Sewell, July 1865-1870.

• Chicago, IL: Alfred L. Sewell & John Edwin Miller, 1870-June 1871.

• Chicago, IL: John Edwin Miller, July 1871-1873; office at 165 West Washington St., 1 May 1872-1873.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: July 1865-June 1870: 16 pp.; page size, 11″ h x 8″ w; price, $1/ year

• July 1870-1871: 32 pp.; octavo; page size untrimmed, 9.25″ h x 6.25″ w

• Nov 1871: sheet folded into 8 pp.; page size untrimmed, 9″ h x 6″ w; marked “supplement number for November, 1871”

• Dec 1871: 48 pp. • Jan 1872: 40 pp. • Feb-Nov 1872: 38 pp. • Dec 1872: 40 pp.

• Circulation: July 1866, 35,000. 1869, 80,000; Feb 1869, “We print now 85,000 copies, full count.” (p. 31); 1869, 89,000 also reported. 1870, 80,000. 1872, 60,000

• An amateur paper called The Little Corporal was published in Stapleton, NY, by William P. Hagadorn; OCLC includes a description of an issue dated 17 Sept 1853

relevant information: Advertising rates in 1869 were $1.50 per line, for advertisements on the three pages of the cover (inside front; inside back; back); until this time, rates for the third page of the cover (the back) were lower than for the other two pages. [8 (Feb 1869): 31]

relevant quotes:

• On the founding: Alfred L. Sewell organized children as the Army of the American Eagle, to raise money for the Sanitary Commission and the Christian Commission, in aid of Union soldiers and their families: “Your precious letters, your sweet heart-words, and your earnest patriotism, seemed to breath [sic] into my spirit a new life, and I said, ‘Oh that I had some medium through which I might talk to my gallant children’s army.’ Then the good thought spoke to me … , and said, ‘Here is the ‘Little Corporal,’ send him as your aid-de-camp. Tell him what to say, and let him take besides a bundle of good things to refresh and amuse your little soldiers by the way.’ Then my idea was only to send him forth to do his whole work at the Great Fair. Then there was no thought of a future for him. But then, I thought what will become of my great army when the Fair is over? … Must my army hereafter only live in the memories of its gallant deeds? … I know full well that all of them will be glad to see the Little Corporal’s face month after month, and let him tell them pretty stories, and talk to them of each other, and hold their hearts together, and lead them into good and pleasant ways.” [“How I Came to Print the ‘Little Corporal.’ ” 1 (July 1865): 1-2]

• In June 1869, the magazine announced that it had absorbed The Little Pilgrim: “ … The Little Pilgrim has enlisted in The Little Corporal’s army. … The Little Pilgrim in coming to his western home readily joins The Little Corporal’s army, and becomes an Aid. Private Queer resigns the position he has so honorably filled, and in the July No. The Little Pilgrim will take his place and thereafter bear the knapsack. … Three cheers for ‘The Little Pilgrim’s Knapsack,’ and three times three for The Little Pilgrim himself.” [8 (June 1869): 92] With the July 1869 issue, the illustration at the head of the puzzles column was changed to show the Pilgrim and the Private working together; the union was acknowledged by a charming little scene: “ ‘Good morning, my dear Pilgrim,’ said Private Queer, as he met the young traveler at the depot in Chicago, after his long ride from Philadelphia. ‘Allow me to carry your knapsack to the carriage, sir. … I am very glad to see you looking so well, sir.’ The Private said all this very rapidly, before the Pilgrim had time to speak, and, indeed, he was a little taken by surprise by the heartiness of the young soldier’s reception, for, in the staid old Quaker city he had been used to deliberation and quiet dignity. He felt sure, however, that the young stranger was a friend, and in a moment grasped his hand warmly and returned his salutation ….” [9 (July 1869): 16] In January 1870, the Corporal ’s cover changed to include the new “recruit”. By July 1870, the Pilgrim was gone from both cover and puzzle column.

• In absorbing The Little Pilgrim, the Corporal invited other editors to yield up their own periodicals: “What one among the Juvenile Magazines will be first to follow ‘The Little Pilgrim’s’ example in enlisting under The Corporal’s banner? There are more than two or three of the Juvenile Magazines that are bringing small gain to their publishers, and some are causing heavy loss. The field of literature is, to many, an inviting one. Many have been tempted to begin literary, and especially juvenile periodicals, and have learned, when too late, that it was not all plain sailing, and that to finally succeed requires a great deal of hard work and a great deal of money, and many other things besides work and money. To all these we say: Come in out of the storm. The Corporal’s tent is high and wide. We can make room for you. Don’t wait for another invitation. Come join our conquering army. … In plain English, we are ready to receive proposals to buy out other Juvenile Magazines and supply their outstanding circulation with numbers of The Little Corporal.” [“Who Comes Next?” 8 (June 1869: 92]

• In July 1870, the page size was reduced, the number of pages was doubled, and the cover was changed: “Our readers will notice the enlargement and change in shape of our magazine. We dislike ever to make any change in form, but, while for five years we have prospered and been very happy in the old shape, we have often felt that smaller pages would be much more convenient, and can but feel glad that the change is now made.” [11 (July 1870): 26] The Corporal ’s “new suit”; was reflected in the frontispiece for the July issue, “The New Suit,” featuring a five-year-old boy (the Corporal had been published for five years) proudly showing off new clothes; the frontispiece was described on page 28.

• Editors advertised the format change in 1870 by sending “editors’ editions” of the magazine “to the editors of between 4,000 and 5,000 American newspapers and magazines.” Enclosed was a description of the periodical: “We have worked hard to establish on a firm basis a national, first-class, original, juvenile magazine, that should be thoroughly American, and an honor and benefit to America and the American Children …. We believe the ideal juvenile magazine should be of equal interest and profit to PARENTS AND CHILDREN—NOT CHILDISH but childlike.” The enclosure included a sample notice for editors to use, despite the fact that “we prefer a good, independent notice”; the sample plays off one of Napoleon Bonaparte’s nicknames and is … flattering: “The wonderful growth of this young Napoleon of the juveniles has been as surprising as it is interesting. Its circulation has shot far ahead of that of any of its competitors. Its matter is entirely original and of a very high order. The freshness and vivacity of its pages cause the eyes of all our young people to sparkle. In its new, improved form it is one of the handsomest, as it is the cheapest, magazine we have ever seen.” [11 (July 1870): enclosure]

• In 1871, the publisher’s offices were destroyed by the Chicago Fire: “In the great conflagration of October 8 and 9, which laid waste the entire business part of the city of Chicago, The Little Corporal Publishing House was also destroyed, with all its contents, including all our printing material, presses, electrotype plates; all the back numbers on hand from the commencement of the Corporal down to the number for November, which was all ready and partly printed.” [13 (Nov 1871): 1] In place of a November issue, subscribers were sent a single sheet folded into four pages and headed “SUPPLEMENT NUMBER FOR NOVEMBER, 1871”: “We send you this sheet to inform you of our great calamity, and to make known our plans for the future, and to ask you to continue your aid now, in a time of great need. The many thousands of the friends of The Little Corporal will surely not forsake us now, but will, we trust, all send in their names for next year, accompanied by others, so that instead of our list falling off it shall be greatly increased. We have, both editor and publisher, just as brave hearts and willing hands for this good work as ever before, and all that we ask is that our friends will stand by us now, and The Little Corporal shall rise from the ashes, stronger, better, and more attractive than ever.” [13 (Nov 1871): 1]

• Since subscribers didn’t receive their usual issue, the next one would have to make up for it: “Notwithstanding this terrible Baptism of Fire, the Little Corporal STILL LIVES, and the number for December will appear early in November, more charming and brilliant than ever. … It will be extra large, containing about double the usual number of pages, so as to make up to our readers partly for the loss of the November number.” [13 (Nov 1871): 1] The Dec 1871 issue was 48 pages and featured a frontispiece by Thomas Nast, of the Little Corporal rising from the ruins.

• Other editors were sympathetic: “That awful Chicago fire, of which we shall never know the severity, but of which we shall never tire of hearing, ‘scorched’ one of the brightest of the juvenile magazines, the Little Corporal; but, we are glad to know, only scorched it, and that it will come out again in a few weeks as before. Let the children everywhere give it a helping hand by at once sending on payments for another year. Don’t leave it for some other juvenile not burnt out, but help it all you can.” [“Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 39 (18 Nov 1871): 2]

Work and Play was absorbed by the Corporal in 1872, as announced in the April issue: “By an arrangement made with the publishers, Milton Bradley & Co., Springfield, Mass., the publication of [Work and Play] will hereafter be discontinued, and its subscribers will be supplied with the Little Corporal for the unexpired term of their subscription.” [14 (April 1872): 154] The puzzles column was titled “Work and Play” beginning with the May 1872 issue.

absorbed: The Little Pilgrim ; Oct 1853-April 1869 • Work and Play ; Jan 1870-March 1872

absorbed by: St. Nicholas ; Nov 1873-Feb 1940, 1943

source of information: July 1865-Dec 1874 bound volumes and scattered issues; Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

• excerpts in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

excerpts online

bibliography:

• “Alfred L. Sewell.” American Phrenological Journal 46 (Oct 1867): 134-135.

• “Our New Firm.” Little Corporal 8 (Feb 1869): 30-31.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 21. [archive.org]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 38.

• “Editors’ Edition.” Little Corporal 11 (July 1870): enclosure.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 634. [google books]

• “Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 39 (18 Nov 1871): 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; pp. 31-32. [archive.org]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: Little Corporal.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872): 6.)

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 277-280.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 148.

• James Marten. “For the Good, the True, and the Beautiful: Northern Children’s Magazines and the Civil War.” Civil War History 41 (March 1995): 57-75.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Our Friend ; 25 Dec 1865-1906?

edited by: P. F. de Gournay

published: Montgomery, AL

frequency: semimonthly

description: Page size, 11.25″ h

relevant quote: “Among the evidences of healthy recuperation in the South, we notice the announcement of a semi-monthly periodical to be published at Montgomery, Ala., and to be entitled ‘Our Friend.’ It is designed chiefly for youth, and will contain select passages from the best authors, ‘original or translated,’ anecdotes of eminent personages, and other matter calculated to foster a love for ‘the great, the good, and the beautiful.’ It will not aim ‘to educate,’ but to awaken a thirst for knowledge.” [Notice. The Round Table 3 (17 March 1866): 166]

source of information: OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Notice. The Round Table 3 (17 March 1866): 166.

The Juvenile Instructor ; 1866-1929 • The Instructor ; 1930-1970 • The New Era 1971-present

edited by: 1866-April 1901, George Quayle Cannon

• May-Oct 1901, Lorenzo Snow

• Nov 1901-Nov 1918, Joseph F. Smith

• Dec 1918-June 1945, Heber J. Grant

• July 1945-April 1951, George Albert Smith

• July 1945-Dec 1949, Milton Bennion

• Jan 1950-Sept 1951, George R. Hill

• May 1951-Dec 1970, David O. McKay

• Jan 1971-March 1976, Doyle L. Green

• April 1976-July 1978, Dean L. Larsen

• Aug 1978-March 1979, James E. Faust

• April 1979-, M. Russell Ballard

published: Salt Lake City, UT: Deseret Sunday School Union, 1866-1970.

• Salt Lake City, UT: Corporation of the Present of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 1970-.

frequency: 1866-1907, semimonthly

description: 1872, 8 pp.; size 24″ h x 18″ w; price, $2.50

• Vol 1-105 (1866-1970); new series, vol 1- (1971-)

• Religious focus: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

source of information: OCLC; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

L. P. Fisher’s Advertisers’ Guide [for the Pacific Coast]. San Francisco, CA: L. P. Fisher, 1870; p. 114. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 190. [archive.org]

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (January/February 1939): 55-60.

• Carolyn J. Bauer and Sharon P. Muir. “Visions, Saints and Zion: Children’s Literature of the Mormon Movement.” Phaedrus 7 (Spring/Summer 1980): 30-38.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Youth’s Friend ; Jan 1866

edited by: J. P. Berry

published: Portland, ME: Brown Thurston

relevant information: proposed; perhaps not published

• Thurston’s intention to publish the magazine was announced in November 1865.

relevant quote: “We have received the prospectus of a new children’s magazine, similar to ‘Our Young Folks,’ the first number of which will be published in January. It is to be called ‘The Youth’s Friend’ and will be under the editorial management of Mr. J. P. Berry, and published by Brown Thurston, Portland.” [“Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 33 (7 Dec 1865): 2]

source of information: Maine Farmer

bibliography:

• Notice. Daily Eastern Argus 33 (30 Nov 1865): 3.

• “Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 33 (7 Dec 1865): 2.

Little Bouquet (also Little Bouquets) ; May? 1866-Aug? 1867 • The Lyceum Banner ; 1 Sept 1867-March 1872 • Little Bouquet ; May 1873-?

edited by: 1 Sept 1867-March 1872, Mrs. H. R. M. Brown • 1872, Mrs. Lou H. Kimball

published: Chicago, IL: Religio-Philosophical Publishing Association, 1866-1867.

• Chicago, IL: L. H. Kimball, 1868-after 1872.

frequency: 1866-1867, monthly; 1 vol/ year

• 1 Sept 1867-March 1872, semimonthly; listed as a weekly in 1868 [“Chicago Periodicals.” Prairie Farmer 39 (25 July 1868): 28]

• May 1873-?, monthly

description: 1866-1867: page size, 14.5″ h

• 1 Sept 1867-March 1872: page size, 9″ h

• 1872: 8 pp.; page size, 28″ h x 21″ w; price, $1

• Circulation: 1872, 3,000

• June 1866 is vol 1 #2

source of information: OCLC; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Chicago Periodicals.” Prairie Farmer 39 (25 July 1868): 28.

• Notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, PA) 3 (Eleventh month 1868): 356. online

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 245.

Kind Words for the Sunday School Children ; Jan 1866-29 Sept 1929

edited by: 1869, Mrs. S. R. Ford. 1871, S. Boykin

published: Greenville, SC: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1866-1868.

• Memphis, TN: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1868-1873.

• Marion, AL: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1874-Nov 1875.

• Macon, GA: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, Dec 1875-June 1886.

• Atlanta, GA: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1886-

frequency: monthly, Jan 1866-June 1869

• semimonthly, July 1869-

• monthly, 1895-

• also available in a weekly edition

description: Religious focus: Baptist

source of information: OCLC; Leavell and Bailey

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Z. T. Leavell and T. J. Bailey. A Complete History of Mississippi Baptists, From the Earliest Times. Jackson, MS: Mississippi Baptist Publishing Co., 1904; vol 1: pp. 210, 233-236, 275, 440, 456, 459, 464, 491, 596-597, 625, 632, 661

Spare Hours ; Jan-Dec 1866

edited by: “Grandpa Prattle”

published: Boston, MA: Patrick Donahoe, Jan-Dec 1866.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 64 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h x 5.5″ w; price, $2/ year • Religious focus: Catholic

relevant quotes: Beginning: “P. Donahoe, Boston, announces the publication of a new illustrated magazine for the young folk. It is to be called ‘Spare Hours,’ and is to appear early in December. there is room for such a publication, and we hope it will prove a success, and that Mr. Donahoe will make it equal to anything of the kind published in this country. A good magazine for the young has been a want long felt. The subscription price is two dollars a year.” [notice. The Catholic World 2 (Jan 1866): 576]

• Other editors were hopeful: “SPARE HOURS: A Monthly Miscellany for the Young. Boston: P. Donahoe. January, 1866. We have received the first number of a new magazine with the above title. It is published by Mr. Donahoe, Boston, is well printed on fine paper, and illustrated with much taste. The matter, of which there are 64 pages, is both original and selected, and displays discrimination and tact on the part of the editor. It would be well to give credit to the source from which the selected matter is taken. This magazine fills a want long felt by the Catholic community in this country. Since the discontinuance of the ‘Youth’s Catholic Magazine’ we have had no periodical that gave us any reading for our children. We cordially welcome the advent of ‘Spare Hours’ amongst us, and trust its subscription list may show that Catholics do appreciate good reading.” [review. The Catholic World 2 (Feb 1866): 718]

• Concluding: “The Spare Hours magazine, which it has been my pleasure to edit during the past year, opened with what appeared to every one supposed to possess a knowledge of such things, under the best possible auspices. Other publishers were satisfying the Protestant community by offering them choice general reading; and we, to satisfy an equal demand, issued the Spare Hours to our own. Faithful, alas, to the precedents of Catholic literature in this country, five millions of Catholics have proved themselves unwilling to support a magazine filled with wholesome reading, combining interesting fact and fancy with the moral teachings of religion. Perhaps our fault has been that our issues have not been crowded with ‘blood and thunder,’—that we have not secured some of the many Dime-Novel writers; but if it has been we feel somewhat consoled in our labors, that our magazine has not been stained by any such compositions. Much as we regret to make the statement, it is nevertheless urgent upon us to say that the Spare Hours will be discontinued after the present number.” [1 (Dec 1866): 761]

source of information: 1866 bound volume; Lyon

bibliography:

• notice. The Catholic World 2 (Jan 1866): 576.

• review. The Catholic World 2 (Feb 1866): 718.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 243.

The Youth’s Temperance Banner ; Jan 1866-1917

cover/masthead: 1867-1868 | 1870-1871, 1873

published: New York, NY: National Temperance Society, Jan 1866-. 1866, publisher at 111 Fulton St.; 1867-1870, publisher at 172 William St.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 4 pp.; folio • 1867, 1870-1871, 1873: page size, 13.25″ h x 10″ w

• Price: Prices: 1866-1867: 1 copy, 30¢/ year; 10 copies, $2/ year; 50 copies, $8/ year; 100 copies, $15/ year. • 1870-1871: 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 8 copies, $1/ year; 10 copies, $1.25/ year; 15 copies, $1.88/ year; 20 copies, $2.50/ year; 30 copies, $3.75/ year; 40 copies, $5/ year; 50 copies, $6.25/ year; 100 copies, $12/ year. • 1800s-1900s, 40¢/ year; after 1907, 25¢/ year

relevant information:

• 1867, 1870-1871, 1873: Under the direction of John N. Stearns, former editor of Robert Merry’s Museum (Feb 1841-Nov 1872). In 1866, subscribers to the Museum who sent in the names of new subscribers could receive a free copy of the Banner with their copy of the Museum.

source of information: 1867-1868, 1870-1871, 1873 scattered issues; Robert Merry’s Museum ; Zion’s Herald ; Christian Advocate ; Christian Union ; OCLC; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• J. N. Stearns. “A Word with My Patrons.” Robert Merry’s Museum 21 (Jan 1866): 125.

• “Two New Temperance Periodicals.” Zion’s Herald and Wesleyan Journal 37 (17 Jan 1866): 10.

• “Merry’s Monthly Chat with his Friends.” Robert Merry’s Museum 22 (July 1866): 186.

• advertisement. Christian Advocate 42 (17 Jan 1867): 24.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 78. [archive.org]

• advertisement. Christian Union 2 (26 Nov 1870): 336.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 708. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 129. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 283-285.

Ke Alaula (The path of light) ; Aperila (April) 1866-Malaki (March) 1873

edited by: Orramel Hinckley Gulick (“O. H. Kulika”), 1866-April 1870

• Anderson Oliver Forbes (“A. O. Polepe”), May-July 1871

• Lorenzo Lyons (“L. Laiana”), Aug 1871-1873

published: Honolulu, HI: n.p., for the Hawaiian Evangelical Association.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: Newspaper format • In Hawaiian

source of information: OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

The Children’s Friend ; Fifth Month (May) 1866-Twelfth Month (Dec) 1887

cover/masthead: 1867 | 1868 | 1870-1876

edited by: Lydia H. Hall, 1866-1867

• Esther K. Smedley, 1866-1867, contributing editor; 1868-1872, editor; 1867, 1871, editor at 13 S. Church St., West Chester, PA

• Anne Bradley, 1873-1874

• Mary Y. Hough, 1875-1887

published: West Chester, PA: James P. Taylor, 1866.

• Philadelphia, PA: James P. Taylor, 1867-.

• Philadelphia, PA: Friends’ Book Association of Philadelphia, 1884; publisher at 1020 Arch St.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1866: 24 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.75″ h x 6.5″ w; price, 15¢/ copy

• 1867-1875: 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.75″ h x 6.5″ w; price, 15¢ or 25¢/ copy; $1.50/ year

• 1871, price, 15¢/ copy; $1.25/ year; $1.25/ 15 months

• Religious focus: Society of Friends (Quaker)

relevant information:

• There appear to be two different issues for Jan-April 1867: volume 1 began Fifth month 1866 and ran for 12 issues; volume 2 began First month 1867.

• The Friend was printed by James B. Rodgers, the Mercantile Printing Rooms, 6th St., Philadelphia, PA. Rodgers died in 1868; the death was announced in the 9th month issue. [“Our Letter Drawer.” 3 (Ninth month 1868): 292]

• Esther Smedley died 13 May 1873; the issue for Oct 1873 (vol 8 #10) featured an engraved portrait of her and a brief biography. Smedley was credited with founding the Friend.

relevant quote: Introduction: “Dear Children: It is with words of cheer we greet you this beautiful Spring morning. We tap timidly at the door of your hearts, and await sweet words in token of your love. … It is not enough that your friends write and that you read, but that they write so that your comprehend; dropping here a seed and there a blossom, that you reading, shall glean of the good, giving warmth and beauty to the crown of life.” The periodical was meant to explore the tenets of the Society of Friends: “To impress upon the minds of the young these beautiful truths, emanating from the Divine mind, and inculcated by our early friends through bitter persecutions, long imprisonment, and even death; to blend with these the useful and attractive in nature, the lights and the shadows of life, is the happy mission of ‘The Children’s Friend.’ ” [Fifth month 1866, p. 1]

• Prospectus for 1869 volume: “It will be the object of the Editor, as heretofore, to prepare reading matter of a purely moral, interesting and instructive character, devoid of that glittering romance which pleases the mind, to the exclusion of more solid worth. Designed more particularly to supply a want long felt in the Society of Friends, it has also met the approval and appreciation of many of other denominations who now place it before their children.” [“Prospectus of The Children’s Friend.” 3 (Eleventh month 1868): inside front cover; cover page 2]

absorbed by: Little Gem and Kindergarten ; Sept 1874?-after April 1879

source of information: 1866-1876, bound volumes & scattered issues (most located at Chester County Historical Society, West Chester, PA); Lyon; Schaf; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, PA: L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 2037. [google books]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 281-282.

Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend ; 6 Oct 1866 • Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly ; 13 Oct 1866-9 Feb 1884

cover/masthead: 1870, 1872

edited by: Frank Leslie

published: New York, NY: Frank Leslie, 6 Oct 1866-9 Feb 1884; publisher at 537 Pearl St., 1867-1868, 1870.

frequency: weekly: Wednesday

description: 8 pp.; small folio

• May 1867: 16 pp.; folio. Prices: 5¢/ copy; 1 copy, $1.25/ 6 months, $2.50/ year; 3 copies, $6.50; 5 copies, $10; $2 for every additional subscription. Monthly parts, 20¢

• 1868: price, $2.50/ year

• 1870: 16 pp.; page size, 13.25″ h x 9″ w. Prices: 5¢/ copy; $2.50/ year

• 1872: 16 pp. Prices: 5¢/ copy; 1 copy, $1.25/ 6 months, $2.50/ year; 3 copies, $6.50; 5 copies, $10; $2 for each additional subscription

• Circlation: 1870, 27,000; 1872, 32,000

• In 1870 and 1872, like Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper, Leslie’s featured “Distinguished Scholars of our Schools”: an engraved portrait of a high school student with a biography. Thus, Leslie’s boasted, it was “the only [paper] that shows any active interest in what our young folk are doing.” [8 (10 Sept 1870): 335]

• 1877, with an 8-page supplement containing an extra story

relevant information: According to a cryptic notice, a sample issue may have been available in March 1866: “We thank Mason for the Child’s Magazine, a new and pleasing venture of Frank Leslie’s; also for the Lady&38217;s Book for April.” [Notice. Flake’s Bulletin (Galveston, Texas) 1 (22 March 1866): 4.] The cryptic part: Mason did publish The Child’s Magazine, but the periodical ended in 1844.

relevant quotes:

• Introduction: “[The magazine] will be published in the form of a handsome paper of eight pages, of three columns each. It will be adapted to the tastes and capacities of boys and girls; but will, nevertheless, contain, as an important feature, a page for children of tender years …. Every number will have five or more illustrations, besides comic and minor engraving.” [1 (13 Oct 1866): 8; in Kelly; p. 161-162]

• By 1868, the number of illustrations had quadrupled: “One of the cheapest pictorial papers ever published. Intended for the amusement of youth of both sexes. … It contains, besides a continued story and well-written tales, accounts of wonderful adventure, descriptions and illustrations of foreign manners and customs, anecdotes and pictures of animals, familiar and funny fables, parlor magic, etc. From twenty to twenty-five engravings appear in each weekly issue.” [advertisement. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868): 8]

• On the end of the magazine: “Mrs. Frank Leslie announces that, owing to the constant growth of her principal weekly and monthly publications, and the demands they make upon the resources of her establishment, she has disposed of the Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly to the Franklin Company of New York, under whose management the next issue will appear.” [36 (9 Feb 1884): 46; in Lyon; p. 306] However, the Franklin Company didn’t carry on the magazine.

source of information: advertisement. Frank Leslie’s Pleasant Hours. 2 (May 1867): back cover; 1870 issue; 1872 issue; Lyon; Maxwell; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Notice. Flake’s Bulletin (Galveston, Texas) 1 (22 March 1866): 4.

• advertisement. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868): 8.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 701. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 120. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 302-307.

• J. P. Guinon and Ralph Adimari. Bibliographic Listing of Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly. Fall River, MA: Edward T. LeBlanc, 1962.

Checklist of Children’s Books, 1837-1876, comp. Barbara Maxwell. Philadelphia, PA: Special Collections, Central Children’s Department, Free Library of Philadelphia, 1975.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 147.

Demorest’s Young America ; Nov 1866-1875

cover/masthead: early 1867 | June 1867 | late 1867-1868 | 1869 | 1870 | 1871-1872

edited by: William J. Demorest

published: New York, NY: W. Jennings Demorest, Nov 1866-1875; publisher at 473 Broadway, in 1867; publisher at 838 Broadway, in 1870-1872

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1867: 32 pp.; duodecimo; page size untrimmed, 6″ h x 4 5/8″ w; prices: 15¢/ issue; 1 copy, $1.50/ year; 5 copies, $1/ year

• Nov 1868-Dec 1870: 40 pp; page size, 7.25″ h x 5.5″ w; price, $1.50/ year

• Jan 1871-1872: 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h x 5.5″ w. Prices: 10¢/ issue; $1/ year

• Circulation: 1869, 10,000; 1872, 15,000

• Nov 1866-Oct 1868 issues have no year on the covers, though all have a copyright date of 1866 on the inside front cover. Issues for vol 1 (Nov 1866-Oct 1867) tend to have only the relevant month on the front cover; issues for vol 2 (Nov 1867-Oct 1868) have volume and issue numbers on the front.

• Vol 1-3 (Nov 1866-Oct 1869); vol 4 (Nov 1869-Dec 1870); vol 5-9 (Jan 1871-Dec 1875)

• A small version was available as a premium: “A pet item was the Miniature Magazine, a tiny handful which sold for 5 cents and was a reproduction of the large one.” (Ross; p. 146)

• The Nov 1866 issue was available as a “school edition” which could be distributed by teachers to pupils as specimens. [Advertisement. American Educational Monthly 4 (Jan 1867): 48M.]

relevant quotes:

• Enlarging the magazine in Nov 1868 began in July: “A Great Secret!—If our Young Americans will come up close, so no others can hear, we will tell them a great secret, and one they will be very much pleased to know. It is—now don’t tell anybody—it is this: that next year, commencing [p. 477] with the November number, we are going to enlarge the Magazine to DOUBLE its present size. Won’t that be great? Bigger pictures, bigger stories, bigger thing altogether. We guess so. Won’t the children be sorry that don’t take it—that’s all!” [2 (July 1868): 476-477]

• In Aug 1868, the enlargement inspired a hint to subscribers: “In the last number of Young America, we hinted at prospective enlargement with the commencement of a new volume. This improvement has been decided upon, notwithstanding the increased expense, and have, therefore, the pleasure of announcing to our young friends that it will positively take place upon the first of November, 1868 …. This enlargement, consequent upon the prosperous state of the little Magazine, and the great encouragement it has received, will enable us to improve it in various other ways—in its pictures, puzzles, illustrated stories, in using larger, plainer type, rendering it altogether a handsomer and more important periodical. But while we are doing this at great cost to ourselves, we hope our little friends will appreciate our efforts, and assist us, by enlarging, as much as possible, the circulation of the Magazine.” [2 (Aug 1868): 543]

• Sept 1868 promised that the new size would “enable us to give finer pictures, clearer type, and a higher class of stories, than many of those we have been obliged to condense for so small a volume.” [2 (Sept 1868): 604]

• On the enlarged magazine, 1868: “With this number [Nov 1868] we commence a new and enlarged series of Young America, which we hope will prove attractive to our large and increasing class of youthful readers. The trouble of changing the form, preparing a new cover, etc., in the midst of the pressure of other business, renders this number less striking in its other features than future numbers will be.” [3 (Nov 1868): 35]

• On the enlarged magazine, 1871: “This number [Jan 1871] of Young America will present itself to our young friends in its enlarged form—a change and mark of growth, which, we hope, they will appreciate and rejoice in. This will enable us to give larger pictures, finer stories, and make many other improvements that will undoubtedly please our readers, and swell our list of subscribers to twice its present proportions, though it is even now by no means inconsiderable.” [5 (Jan 1871): 36]

• On merging with Demorest’s Illustrated Magazine, 1875: “Juvenile magazines do not pay. Boys and girls naturally want them bright, and handsome, and interesting, but parents are not willing to pay the cost of them; therefore, there is no profit on the circulation, and as they do not attract advertising patronage, the larger the circulation the greater the loss. … [The magazine] might still have lived and grown, but for another fact in connection with juvenile periodicals; it is this—that they require constantly to find a new audience to take the place of the one which is outgrowing them, and this involves an expenditure of time, and strength, and enterprise which the net result does not warrant, and which can be put to much more profitable use.” [9 (Sept 1875): 277; in Lyon, p. 290] Ross includes a quote in which the Demorests mourn that the magazine failed because young readers were too adult: “They are young men and young women by the time they leave the nursery, and want grown papers, and grown books, and grown magazines …. They imbibe a taste for the horrible, the exaggerated, and marvelous, which is catered to by unscrupulous persons, and which makes all else seem insipid and namby-pamby to them.” (in Ross; p. 147)

continued by: “Young America” column in Demorest’s Monthly Magazine

source of information: 1866-1872, scattered issues and bound volumes; Lyon; American Educational Monthly ;AAS catalog; Kelly; Ross; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Advertisement. The Independent 18 (27 Sept 1866): 3.

• Advertisement. American Educational Monthly 4 (Jan 1867): 48M.

• Review. The New-England Historical and Genealogical Register 21 (Jan 1867): 95.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 76. [archive.org]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 38.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 706. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 126. [archive.org]

• Frank Luther Mott. A History of American Magazines: vol 3, 1865-1885. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1938. pp. 175-176.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (January/February 1939): 55-60.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 286-290.

• Ishbel Ross. Crusades & Crinolines. NY: Harper & Row, 1963; pp. 145-147

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; pp. 147-148.

The Busy Bee ; 10 Nov 1866, Jan 1867-after Feb 1874

cover/masthead: 1866 | Jan-Oct 1867 | Dec 1867-1868, 1874

edited by: Covington F. Seiss, 1872

published: Germantown, Philadelphia, PA: Orphans’ Home, for the Lutheran Association for the Publication of Religious Periodicals, 1867; publisher at the Orphans’ Home, Germantown, PA.

• Philadelphia, PA: the Lutheran Association for the Publication of Religious Periodicals, 1868; 1868-1870, publisher at 807 Vine St.; 1872-1874, publisher at 117 N. 6th St.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 14.25″ h x 10″ w

• 1867: prices, 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 25 copies, $5.75/ year; 50 copies, $10/ year; 100 copies, $15/ year

• 1868: prices, 1 copy, 40¢/ year; 10 copies, $2.50/ year; 25 copies, $6/ year; 50 copies, $10/ year; 75 copies, $13/ year; 100 copies, $15/ year

• 1873-1874: prices were “reduced”: 1 copy, 40¢/ year; 4 copies, each 25¢/ year; 4-25 copies, each 22¢/ year; 26-50 copies, each 20¢/ year; 51-70 copies, each 18¢/ year; 71-90 copies, each 16¢/ year; 91-100 copies, each 15¢/ year; 101-300 copies, 14¢/ year; 301+ copies, each 12¢/ year

• Religious focus: Lutheran

relevant information:

• The issue for 10 Nov 1866 was a sample issue; the Jan 1867 issue was vol 1 #1.

• Issues for 1866 and 1867 were printed at the Orphans’ Home: “ [T]he Orphans’ Home, at Germantown, contemplates publishing a monthly paper, called ‘THE BUSY BEE.’ The profits derived from this enterprise will be devoted to the ‘Home.’ ” [10 Nov 1866: 1] The July 1867 issue, however, made clear that the Home was in financial trouble: “This time I must tell you, that we are in great distress. It oftimes seems to me, that there was never such a dark hour upon us, as it is just now. Our income for the last three months has been very small, and our expenses very heavy.” [1 (July 1867, p. 3] The next issue included a new address for correspondence; by Dec 1867, the Orphan’s Home was no longer listed in the masthead.

• The Orphans’ Home also did commercial printing: “JOB PRINTING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS [i]s executed at the Orphans’ Home Printing Office, and orders from our friends will be delivered, in any part of Philadelphia by the hand of one of our boys, or elsewhere by mail or express, without charge.” [1 (July 1867): 4]

• The Bee did not accept advertising.

relevant quote: A rebus in the sample issue asked for subscriptions and explained how the paper was put together: “The Busy [bee] where is it printed? It is printed in Philadelphia, at Leisenring’s Steam Printing House, Nos. 237 and 239 Dock Street, where excellent and cheap printing can be done. But if we are compelled to print it outside our own hive, the wings of our little Bee would soon be laden with debts, and the poor little thing would fall in the water and be drowned. … We will get all that belongs to a small printing oestablishment, with the exception of a [printer]. Our oldest boy understands type-setting. He will set the type—the form will be prepared here, and we will send it to the city to be printed. It will please you to know, that the paper you get comes from an Orphans’ Home, and that the type is set by orphan boys, and that the girls have folded the papers and prepared them to be sent to you. But you will say, this is not what it ought to be; you must have a [steam press] … There are over thirty thousand children who will receive this paper. If each of you will give but five cents … , we will get one hundred and fifty thousand cents. For this money we can buy as much type as it will take to print “The Busy Bee,” and something will be left to buy a job press, by which we could earn a great deal of money. A few days ago I received $100 for that purpose.” [10 Nov 1866: 4]

source of information: 1866-1868, 1874, scattered bound issues; Rowell; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 99. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 161. [archive.org]

Die Christliche Kinderzeitung (Christian children’s newspaper); 1867-1885?

edited by: Karl Kissling

published: St. Louis, MO: A. Wiebusch & Son Printing Co.

frequency: semimonthly

description: Religious focus: German Evangelical Synod of North America

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979): 27-31.

The Guardian Angel ; 1867-after 1884

edited by: 1868: James O’Reilly; Martin I. J. Griffin; William F. Cook

• 1884: John Arthur Henry; Daniel F. Gillin

published: Philadelphia, PA: Gillin, McGuegan & Griffin, 1869.

• Philadelphia, PA: Gillin, McGuigan & Griffin, 1870; publisher at 706 Chestnut St.

• Philadelphia, PA: Gillin & McGuigan, 1872; publisher at 706 Chestnut St.

• Philadelphia, PA: Daniel F. Gillin, 1884; publisher at 717 Sansom St.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; price, 50¢/ year

• Page size: 1869, 28″ h x 21″ w. 1870, 24″ h x 19″ w. 1872, 26″ h x 20″ w

• Circulation: 1870, 42,000. 1872, 25,000

• Religious focus: Catholic

relevant quote: On the printing office: “The first number was issued from the old United States Hotel, and the publishers, in 1868, bought the printing-office at No. 701 Chestnut Street.” [Schaf]

relevant information: The Feb 1868 and Sept 1868 issues of the Angel included stories by Maurice F. Egan, who later published works of fiction and nonfiction and was appointed U. S. Minister to Denmark; the stories were reprinted in The American Catholic Historical Researches, 1910. [Martin I. J. Griffin. “An Ambassador‘s First Printed Stories.” Philadelphia, PA: Martin I. J. Griffin, 1910; pp. 336-339. [google books]

relevant quote: The Angel claimed to “[circulate] in every State and territory, also Canada and West Indies”; it also stated that it was “the pioneer of catholic juvenile monthlies”. (It wasn’t.) [Rowell 1872; p. 162]

source of information: Rowell; Griffin; Scharf

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 100. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 736. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 162. [archive.org]

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, PA: L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 2038. [google books]

• Thomas C. Middleton. “Catholic Periodicals Published in the United States.” Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia. N.p.: American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia, 1908; vol 19, p. 37. [google books]

• Martin I. J. Griffin. “An Ambassador‘s First Printed Stories.” in The American Catholic Historical Researches, 1910. Philadelphia, PA: Martin I. J. Griffin, 1910; pp. 336-339. [google books]

The Sparkling Gem ; 1867-after 1868

edited by: Mrs. M. M. B. Goodwin

published: Indianapolis, IN: A. Q. Goodwin; publisher at Box 1174

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; octavo; price, 50¢/ year

• Temperance focus

source of information: Rowell; Little Chief

bibliography:

• Notice. Indiana School Journal 13 (Jan 1868): 42. [google books]

• Notice. The Little Chief 2 (April 1868): 63.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 29. [archive.org]

Young Americans ; 1867-1904

published: Albany, NY

source of information: Kelly

bibliography:

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Children’s Hour ; Jan 1867-June 1874

cover/masthead: 1867-1870

edited by: Timothy Shay Arthur

published: Philadelphia, PA: T. S. Arthur & Son, Jan 1867-June 1874; publisher at 809 & 811 Chestnut St., 1867, Feb 1869-1870

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: Jan 1867-1870, 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 7.75″ h x 6″ w. Prices: 1 copy, $1.25/ year; 15¢/ issue; 5 copies, $5/ year; 10 copies, $10/ year

• 1871, 40 pp.

relevant quotes:

• On the title: “We are indebted to Mr. Longfellow for the beautiful title of our magazine. It was suggested by his exquisite poem, “The Children’s Hour,” one of the sweetest in our language, and its quotation here is a fitting introduction to our new periodical, which is to be specially for the children.” [“The Title of Our Magazine.” 1 (Jan 1867): inside front cover; cover p. 2]

• The magazine’s focus was made clear in its advertisements: “Our new Magazine will come as a pleasant companion, friend and counsellor of the little ones; and as a helper in the work of storing up things good and true, and beautiful in their minds, through a healthy culture of the imagination and an attractive illustration of those precepts that lie at the foundation of all right living. It will aim to inspire children with reverence for God and a sense of His loving and fatherly care; and to lead them to unselfish actions—to be gentle, forbearing, merciful, just, pure, brave, and peaceable.” [1 (Jan 1867): inside back cover; cover p. 3]

• The issues for Jan and Feb 1867 were made available early: “The first number of our magazine was issued in advance of the date, so as to get it well before the public in time for the subscribing season. This number also anticipates the regular date, though not so much as the first, in order that our little friends, (we number them already by thousands) may not be kept waiting too long for a second visit from the “Children’s Hour.” [“Our Second Number.” 1 (Feb 1867): inside front cover; cover p. 2]

• Writers were to take their audience seriously: “Bear in mind, that the CHILDREN’S HOUR is for the “Little Ones,” and in writing for them, avoid as far as possible, the use of very long words, and of those not in common use, and especially avoid idioms and slang phrases. The thought need not be puerile, nor the language ‘babyish.’ Children understand higher things than many grown people imagine; but then, you must reach their understandings through words with which they are familiar. If they do not know the exact meaning of the language used, you will fail in your attempt to interest and instruct them. Write with care; with just as much care in the composition of your sentences, as if you were writing with a view to literary criticism. There is an appearance of haste, and a slovenliness, about a great deal of the manuscript we receive, as if the writers thought that anything would do for children. … As you write, bring before you, in imagination, a group of children, and try to feel for them an interest that goes beyond their mere entertainment for the hour. Write as cheerfully, lovingly, and tenderly as you please. Make them as happy as you can; keep their sky as free from clouds and rain as you can; only, leave them with an influence for good. Teach them something that, if kept in mind, will help them to become better men and women.” [“To Correspondents.” 1 (April 1867): inside front cover; cover p. 2]

relevant information: In 1867, some stories from the Children’s Hour were reprinted separately: “We have made a selection of some of the choice little stories in the “Children’s Hour,” and put them up in eight small books, each with a handsome illuminated cover”; titles: The Moth and the Candle; Willy’s Journey to Heaven; and Reading the Bible, The Motherless Boy, The Sick Child; and Who Took him on the Other Side, The Child Witness, The Sunny Maple, Into the Sunshine; and Afraid in the Dark, and A Little Gentleman. [2 (June 1867): inside front cover; cover p. 2]

absorbed by: St. Nicholas Magazine ; Nov 1873-Feb 1940, 1943

source of information: Jan 1867-Dec 1870, scattered issues; 1868 bound volume; Lyon; AAS catalog; Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, PA) 3 (Eleventh month 1868): 356. online

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 99. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 161. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 296-298.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Little Chief ; Jan 1867-Feb 1872

cover/masthead: 1871

edited by: Jan 1867-?, W. W. Dowling • 1868?-1871, A. C. Shortridge • 1870, “Laura Spring” • 1871, W. J. Button

published: Indianapolis, IN: Dowling & Shortridge, 1867-1868.

• Indianapolis, IN: Shortridge & Alden, Feb-June 1869.

• Indianapolis, IN: A. C. Shortridge, July 1869-June 1870.

• Indianapolis, IN: Shortridge & Button, July 1870-May 1871.

• Indianapolis, IN: Shortridge, Button & Hanley, June-July 1871.

• Indianapolis, IN: Button & Hanley, Aug-Oct 1871.

• Indianapolis, IN: Button & Hobbs, Jan-Feb 1872.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol per year

description: 1871: 32 pp.; page size, 10″ h x 7″ w; price, 75¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 5,000; 1872, 4,000

source of information: Feb 1871 issue; The Bright Side; Lyon; AAS catalog; NUC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Notice. Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 20 (Feb 1867): 72.

• Notice. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868): 6.

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 38.

• Advertisement. The Bright Side. 2 (March 1870): 14.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 644. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 44. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 244-245.

The Nursery ; Jan 1867-Oct 1880

cover/masthead: 1868 | 1870-1875

edited by: Fanny P. Seavers, 1867-1868

published: Boston, MA: John L. Shorey, Jan 1867-Oct 1880; publisher at 13 Washington St., Jan 1867-Dec 1869; publisher at 36 Bromfield St., Dec 1870-1872.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.5″ h x 6″ w; duodecimo; price, $1.50/ year; 15¢/ issue

• Circulation: 1872, 85,000

• Intended for “youngest readers,” the magazine featured tiny stories in large type; some included pronunciation guides. Each page had at least one illustration.

• Copyrighted by Fanny P. Seavers, 1867; copyrighted by John L. Shorey, 1869, 1872

continued by: Our Little Ones and the Nursery ; Nov 1880-April 1899

relevant quote: The editor of The Literary World mourned the end of the Nursery in 1881: “We are sorry to lose the Nursery by absorption into Our Little Ones, a new Boston monthly. The Nursery has been too good, too long a visitor into our homes, and too valuable in every respect, thus to relinquish its identity.” [“News and Notes.” 12 (8 Oct 1881): 354.]

source of information: 1867-1869, 1871-1872 scattered issues and bound volumes; Lyon; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• microfilm: Nineteenth-century children’s periodicals. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1979.

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 38.

Wentworth’s Boston Commercial Directory for 1871. Boston: Wentworth & Co., 1870; p. 119. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• “News and Notes.” The Literary World 12 (8 O ct 1881): 354.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 352-355.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Riverside Magazine for Young People ; Jan 1867-Dec 1870

cover/masthead: 1867-1869

edited by: Horace Elisha Scudder

published: New York, NY: Hurd & Houghton, Jan 1867-Dec 1870.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: 48 pp.; large octavo; page size, 9.5″ h x 6.5″ w; prices: 25¢/ each; 1 copy, $2.50/ year; 3 copies, $6.50; 5 copies, $10; 10 copies, $20; 20 copies, $35; clergymen & teachers, $2/ year

• A copy of the Jan 1867 issue was sent in Nov 1867 to each subscriber to The Evening Post who received the paper by mail; the issue included a prospectus for the 1868 Riverside.

• Circulation: 1869, 20,000

relevant quotes: Conclusion: “I hope the children who have read the ‘Riverside’ for four years are as sorry to have it come to an end as I am. But it is a great deal better to have a good thing and enjoy it, than to be missing things and grieving over not having them. You have had the ‘Riverside’ for four years, and I believe you have enjoyed it, for I have not yet seen the boy or girl who ‘hates that old Magazine.’ I have seen a great many who like it thoroughly, and many pleasant letters from old and young make me believe it, whether I want to or not, and I want to. Now you will never have a fifth volume of the ‘Riverside,’ so enjoy the four! And I have had four or five years of pleasure, editing this Magazine. Nobody can take those away from me. I have made friends by it that I hope never to lose. I do not expect to edit any more magazines for young people, but I mean to enjoy the recollection of the days when I edited the ‘Riverside,’ and had the pleasure every month of seeing its bright cover flying away, with its treasure of story and verse and picture, to gladden the eyes of children whom I never should see. If the Editor of ‘Scribner’s Monthly’ and my grown up family are as good friends as we have been, nobody could ask more.” [“Good-by.” 4 (Dec 1870): 575]

• The editor of the Christian Union sympathized with Riverside’s young readers: “In absorbing the Riverside Magazine, the new Scribner’s Monthly has laid itself open, we fear, to a good deal of criticism from that large portion of the public, whose indignation is none the less poignant because it is concealed under pinafores and jackets. The young folks did like the Riverside, even if their patronage was insufficient to keep it going: they loved the rich and glowing cover which enclosed it, the choice engravings wherewith it abounded: the delightful stories and the exquisite essays which it enshrined, above all they loved Mr. Scudder, its editor, whose tales were apples of gold in pictures of silver, or a dish of red strawberries smothered in cream, or whatever in peach orchard or vine-land is fragrant and juicy, and unutterably delicious. Where did all the subscribers go, that Riverside should thus flit away in the witching hours of December? Has mr. Scudder become a sort of modern Pied Piper, gathering all the bright-faced ones by the melody of his pipings into the wind-swept plains of Cambridge, and then spiriting them away into unseen caves amid the imperceptible mountains of the Charles River? If he will tell them more, and yet more, of Dream Children, they will be content even if giant Scribner has swallowed up their own dear Riverside.” [“Literary Notes.” The Christian Union 3 Dec 1870: 343]

• Four years after Riverside’s demise, readers ranked it second among the “modern American juvenile magazines” in an unscientific poll reported in The Literary World [5 (1 Aug 1874): 45]

merged with: Scribner’s Monthly (for adults)

source of information: 1867-1870 bound vols & scattered issues; Lyon; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• APS III (1850-1900), reel 52

bibliography:

• Notice. American Phrenological Journal 45 (Jan 1867): 30.

• Notice. Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 20 (Feb 1867): 71.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 78. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 707. [google books]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 37.

• “Literary Notes.” The Christian Union 3 Dec 1870: 343.

• comment on demise. The Literary World 5 (1 June 1874): 15.

• young readers rate. The Literary World 5 (1 Aug 1874): 45.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (January/February 1939): 55-60.

• Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941); p. 133.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 199-301.

• Ellen B. Ballou, “Horace Elisha Scudder and the Riverside Magazine.” Harvard Library Bulletin, 14 (Autumn 1960): 426-452.

• R. Gordon Kelly. Mother was a Lady. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1974.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; pp. 148-150.

• Selma Lanes. “A Literary Correspondence Between H. E. Scudder and H. C. Andersen.” The Horn Book Magazine 65 (1989): 39-47, 186-193. Reprinted in Through the Looking Glass. Boston: David R. Godine, 2004; pp. 65-84.

Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly ; Jan 1867-July 1868

edited by: Ebenezer Thompson Baird; William Logan Baird, 1867-1868

published: Richmond, VA: White & Howard, Jan-March 1867.

• Richmond, VA: Messrs. Baird & J. W. Turner, April-Sept 1867.

• Richmond, VA: Messrs. Baird, Oct-Dec 1867.

• Richmond, VA: Baird & Brother, Jan-July 1868.

• Baltimore, MD: Baird & Brother, Jan-July 1868.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 32 pp.; octavo; price, $1.50/ year

relevant information: Martin, the Miner-Boy of Mansfeldt (Helena, AR: Thomas Ward White) was reprinted from a story in the Monthly. [advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer 3 (Dec 1869): 30]

absorbed by: Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls • Burke’s Magazine for Boys and Girls ; 6 July 1867-Dec 1871

relevant quote: The merging of the Monthly with Burke’s was announced in Burke’s via a note dated 23 July 1868: “The undersigned [E. T. Baird] announces to the former friends and patrons of this Monthly, that he has this day agreed on terms with Messrs. J. W. Burke Co. for merging it into Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls. … We shall not detain our young friends by any extended remarks assigning reasons for this arrangement. A word is sufficient. The whole responsibility for the Monthly has rested on [E. T. Baird], who was its founder, senior editor, and sole proprietor, and he has utterly failed to find the time to give to the enterprise which he felt due to his readers, his correspondents, and himself. The distance at which the junior editor, Prof. Wm. Logan Baird, resided, rendered it impossible for him to extend the aid which was requisite to relieve this weight of responsibility. Hence, what [E. T. Baird] hoped would become a coveted means of recreation from heavy official cares, he has found, in the midst of the pressure of labor resting on him, to be an incumbrance.” [“A Card: To the Subscribers of the Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls 2 (15 Aug 1868): 52]

source of information: Burke’s; Kelly; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “A Card: To the Subscribers of the Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls 2 (15 Aug 1868): 52.

• advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer 3 (Dec 1869): 30.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 144.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 148.

Sunday School Gem ; Jan 1867-after 1914

edited by: 1867, E. H. Thomas; George Ross; J. H. Redsecker

• Jan 1869-1878, J. H. Redsecker

• Jan 1879-1896, George Sigler

• 1897-after 1914, W. A. Laverty

published: Lancaster, PA: E. H. Thomas, Jan 1867-1870.

• Harrisburg, PA, 1872.

• Harrisburg, PA: Board of Publication of the General Eldership of the Church of God, 1882.

frequency: Jan 1867-1883, monthly

• 1884-1905, semimonthly

• 1906-after 1914, weekly

description: 1870-1872: 4 pp.; page size, 23″ h x 17″ w; price, 20¢/ year

• 1882: 4 pp.; page size, 23″ h x 16″ w; price, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 9,000. 1872, 10,200. 1882, less than 10,000

• Religious focus: Church of God

relevant information: Also referred to in documents as “The Church of God Sunday-School Paper” and “The Church of God Sunday-School Gem”.

• Originally proposed in May 1860, but no committee was formed to publish it until 1866. The first name given was “The Church of God Sunday-School Paper,” which was changed by E. H. Thomas to the slightly better “The Church of God Sunday-School Gem” and, finally, to the Sunday School Gem. Publication was announced in the 3 Jan 1867 issue of The Church Advocate.

• Forney includes details of the Gem ’s finances in reports of meetings of the board of elders.

source of information: Forney; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 issue only)

bibliography:

• J. I. Mombert. An Authentic History of Lancaster County. Lancaster, PA: J. E. Barr & Co., 1869; p. 451.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 730. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 154. [archive.org]

American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1882; p. 335. [google books]

• C. H. Forney. History of the Churches of God in the United States of North America. Harrisburg, PA: Board of Directors of the Publishing House and Book Room of the Churches of God, 1914; pp. 830-833, also pp. 171, 175, 524, 770, 772-773, 775, 776, 778, 780, 782, 783, 784, 786, 788, 790, 792, 794, 799, 837. [google books]

Oliver Optic’s Magazine: Our Boys and Girls ; 5 Jan 1867-Dec 1873 • Oliver Optic’s Magazine ; Jan 1874-Dec 1875

cover/masthead: 1867 | 1871

edited by: William T. Adams (“Oliver Optic”)

published: Boston: Lee & Shepard, 1 Nov 1867-1875; publisher at 149 Washington St.

frequency: 5 Jan 1867-1870, weekly; 2 vol/ year

• 1871-Dec 1875, monthly

description: 5 Jan-June 1867: 12 pp.; octavo; page size untrimmed, 10″ h x 6.75″ w; price, $2.25/ year

• July 1867-Dec 1870: 16 pp.; price, $2.50/ year; $1.25/ volume

• Jan 1871-1875: 64 pp.; page size untrimmed, 10″ h x 7″ w. 1871: price, 25¢/ issue; $2.50/ year

• Circulation: 1869 (from magazine), 100,000. 1870, 20,000. 1872, 22,000. 1875 (from magazine), 11,000

relevant information: Issues were reprinted in 1872 as Our Boys and Girls Mirror.

relevant quote: “For several years we have believed that the Young People of the United States wanted and needed a magazine which should visit them every week, instead of every month. We know what pleasure the older members of the family derive from the weekly coming of the religious, agricultural, and literary papers, and we are confident that the younger branches will experience a similar satisfaction in the frequent appearance of a publication adapted to their wants and their tastes. … We intend to furnish a magazine which shall interest and amuse Our Boys and Girls, while it makes them wiser and better. … ” [“Salutatory.” 1 (5 Jan 1867): 7.]

source of information: 1868-1871 bound vols & scattered issues; Lyon; Maxwell; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• APS II (1850-1900), reels 1850-1900

bibliography:

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 37-38.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 665. [google books]

Wentworth’s Boston Commercial Directory for 1871. Boston: Wentworth & Co., 1870; p. 119. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899): 133-6.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 291-295.

Checklist of Children’s Books, 1837-1876, comp. Barbara Maxwell. Philadelphia, PA: Special Collections, Central Children’s Department, Free Library of Philadelphia, 1975.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 146.

The School and Fireside ; 11 Jan-after 10 May 1867

edited by: George A. Chase

published: Louisville, KY: Bradley & Gilbert.

frequency: semimonthly, except July & Aug

description: Page size, 12.5″ h

relevant quote: “From Louisville, Ky., we have received the first number of a neatly printed sheet, entitled ‘The School and Fireside; a journal for Schools and Families;’ which, as we learn from its prospectus, is the only paper of the kind published south of the Ohio River. May al success attend this pioneer in a good cause! We shall be happy to exchange with it.” [notice. Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 20 (Feb 1867): 66]

source of information: OCLC

bibliography:

• notice. Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 20 (Feb 1867): 66.

The Young Catholic’s Guide ; May 1867-April 1870

published: Chicago, IL: John Graham.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: Page size, 8.5″ h

source of information: OCLC; NUC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls ; 6 July 1867-10 Dec 1870 • Burke’s Magazine for Boys and Girls ; Jan-Dec 1871

cover/masthead: 1868

edited by: T. A. Burke

published: Macon, GA: J. W. Burke, 6 July 1867-Dec 1871. Publisher listed as J. W. Burke & Co., 1871

frequency: weekly, 6 July 1867-10 Dec 1870; 1 vol/ year

• monthly, 1871

description: 6 July 1867-10 Dec 1870: 8 pp.; quarto; page size untrimmed, 13″ h x 10″ w. Price: 1 copy, 5¢/ each; 50¢/ three months; $1/ six months; $2/ year; 10 copies, $15/ year; 20 copies, $30/ year

• Jan-Dec 1871: 48 pp.; page size, 9.5″ h

relevant information: Though Burke had published the Children's Guide, he appears to have felt a need to purchase more illustrations before his new endeavor: “Parties who have duplicates of Engravings, or Electrotypes of Woodcuts, suitable for illustrating a Child’s Magazine, will find sale by sending proofs and prices to the undersigned. J. W. BURKE & CO., Macon, Ga.” [“To Publishers.” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 8 (1 Nov 1866): 33]

absorbed: Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly ; Jan 1867-July 1868

source of information: Aug 1868 issue; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “To Publishers.” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 8 (1 Nov 1866): 33.

• “Book Notices.” Southern Planter and Farmer 5 (Aug 1871): 503.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 244.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 148.

Children of the West ; 1868-1869

edited by: W. F. Wells

published: Mount Lebanon, LA: W. F. Wells

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size 23″ h x 16″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Religious focus: Baptist

source of information: Rowell; Paxton; Home Advocate

bibliography:

• Notice. The Home Advocate 1 (13 Feb 1869): 4; online at UNT Digital Library

• Advertisement. The Home Advocate 1 (20 Feb 1869): 2; online at UNT Digital Library

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 39. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 658. [google books]

• W. E. Paxton. A History of the Baptists of Louisiana. St. Louis, MO: C. R. Barns Publishing Co., 1888; p. 489. [archive.org]

The Sunday School Messenger ; 1868-after June 1875

published: Chicago, IL: Holy Family Sunday School Association.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1871: page size, 7.5″ h

• June 1875 is vol 8 #6

• Religious focus: Catholic

source of information: AAS catalog; ULS; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

Young People’s Magazine ; 1868-1887

edited by: P. W. Ziegler

published: Philadelphia, PA

source of information: Lyon

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 245.

The Little Gleaner ; 1868-1869?

edited by: Olive O. Lee

published: Fredericksburg, VA

frequency: monthly?; 1 vol/ year

description: Page size, 9″ h • Lyon (and Frank Luther Mott) say that the magazine began in 1867

• Religious focus

source of information: OCLC

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 244.

Youth’s Manual ; Jan-26 June, Aug-Dec 1868, Jan 1869 • The Weekly Manual ; 6 Feb 1869 • The Youth’s Manual ; 25 Feb, July-Oct, Dec 1869 • The Temperance Star ; 6-20 Jan 1870 • The Youth’s Guide ; 7 April-12 May 1870

cover/masthead: Jan 1868-Jan 1869 | 6 Feb 1869 | 25 Feb-Dec 1869 | Jan 1870 | April-May 1870

published: Horicon, NY: James F. Hart

frequency: Jan-May, monthly; • June 1868, semimonthly • Aug-Dec 1868, monthly • 6 Feb 1869, weekly • Jan, April-May 1870, semimonthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 11.5-15.25″ h

• Prices: 1868, 15¢/ year. • 1869: weekly, 60¢/ year; semimonthly, 30¢/ year; monthly, 25¢/ year. • 1870: semimonthly (Jan), 50¢/ year; monthly, 25¢/ year; semimonthly (April-May), 30¢/ year

• Circulation: peak, 600. May 1870, 200

• Temperance focus, Jan 1870

• Religious focus, April-May 1870

relevant information: The issue for 6 Feb 1869 is also marked as 1 March 1869 on an interior page.

• The editor’s struggles with grammar and professionalism may indicate that this was an amateur periodical; however, it carried at least one solid page of advertising in most issues, which most amateur papers appear not to have done.

relevant quotes: No one seems to have tried harder than James Hart to keep a periodical going. He tried it monthly. He tried it weekly. He tried it semimonthly. He changed the name. He pointed out how impossible it was to carry on without an income. He changed the focus. Nothing worked. Hart’s struggles encapsulate just how difficult it was for an independent publisher to maintain a children’s periodical.

• On the switch to a weekly and on economic difficulties (grammar was not one of Hart’s strengths): “Our readers will observe that we have changed the name of our paper and call it The Weekly Manual, but it is the same class paper that it was before, calculated for the benefit of Children and Youth; we have oplaced the subscription price within reach of all, even the poorest class of people, it being only sixty Cents a Year. Only sixty cents for fifty-two numbers of the Manual, who has got so small a soul that they will not give sixty cents for our paper a year, when we are so poor and ne[e]dy; we have tried every way we could to induce people to subscribe for our paper, but have very poor success; we have only received $3.00 for subscriptions since the first of January; we are in debt for rent and firewood; we can scarcely get food enough to eat; we are discouraged, and who would not be, if placed in the same place that we are, and under the same circumstances? we think no one. We would be happy to keep our paper up, but how can we do it without means; we know that our paper is poorly printed and the reason why is becausde we have not got a press suitable to print a paper on, nor have we got the means to buy a new one with. It would take but a few hundred subscribers to place us in circumstances to print our paper in good stile, now if you have any charity for a poor downcast, and almost God forsaken Editor, pray lend us a helping hand, tell your neighbors how needy we are, and try to induce them to subscribe for our paper, tell them it is a paper worthy of their patronage, show them a copy, let them read it, and we have no doubt they will be inclined to subscribe for it. Some may think that our pleading up poverty is all a humbug to get subscribers, but if you do not believe we are poor, just come and see for yourselves.” [“The Manual.” The Weekly Manual 2 (6 Feb 1869): 11.]

• Weekly didn’t work, and Hart suspended publication, hoping to publish semimonthly if he could afford it; he may have chosen to suspend after the 26 Feb 1869 issue because 300 subscribers were then due to renew: “The cause of the suspension of the Manual until the first of April is from the fact that we have got out of stock, and out of means to buy more with, and we have got to wait awhile in order to recruit up before we can go on with out paper, this seems rather bad that a paper as interesting as the Manual has been should have to be su[s]pended for a time, in or[d]er to procure means to buy stock with, it shows that there is a lacking in the duty of our friends, for it is the duty of every person who knows our situation, to assist in susta[i]ning our paper, and we hope that hereafter, our friends will be more diligent in trying to procuring subscriber [sic] for our paper. … Unless we can obtain a larger circulation we shall be compelled to change our paper back to a monthly paper again, but this we do not want to do if we can possibly avoid it ….” [Notice of suspension. The Youth’s Manual 2 (26 Feb 1869): 15.]

• Hart’s plans went awry, and the month-long suspension extended itself to three months, with the proposed semimonthly paper changing back to a monthly: “We wanted to have sent it out at the time specified in our last number, but at that time, we had no place to print it. But soon after, we succeeded in purchasing a little place to live, but as it took a long time to get our affairs arranged, therefore we have not been able to get it out until now …. We shall not try to print the Manual but once a month, but we hope that it will be a welcome visitor in every family, and be read with pleasure, and its contents may do much good.” [“Our Explanation and Apology.” The Youth’s Manual 2 (July 1869): 18.]

• Hart also ungrammatically encouraged subscribers to write for the Manual : “We should be very happy to have our young readers write for our paper, no matter if you can’t write very well, we can read it, write something about your Sabbath School, your Temperance Society, &c., it will be interesting to read pieces written by our little friends.” [The Youth’s Manual 2 (July 1869): 18.]

• Results were encouraging, and Hart decided to try again for a semimonthly paper in 1870: “Our paper is still gaining a circulation far beyond our expectation, and we think that we shall be able to commence our new volume with a much larger circulation than we even anticipated. We think of publishing our paper semi-monthly next year, if we can arrange our other business so that we can get time to publish it so often—we shall give notice in our next number, if we conclude to do so.” [“Our Paper.” The Youth’s Manual 2 (Oct 1869): 31.]

• The “next number,” however, announced a new paper: “We hereby give notice that this is the last number of the Manual that will be published, but we are not going to stop printing a paper, oh, no! but we thought it best to change the name, and call it ‘The Temperance Star.’ … [W]e shall commence the publication of the Star the first of January, and publish it once in two weeks …. We are a little ashamed of the manner in which we have conducted the Manual for the past year, and shall try to do better in the future.” [“Our Paper.” The Youth’s Manual 2 (Dec 1869): 29.]

• On the change to a temperance paper: “It is with mixed feelings of pride and diffidence that we commence the publication of our new edition, and commit it to the tender mercy of the public; diffident, in the consciousness of many imperfections in style, matter, and execution. But time and perseverance, will enable us, doubtless, to correct many fa[u]lts; and by the aid of new printing materials, which we shall procure as soon as convenient, will enable us to give a clear and more delicate surface impression to its pages. We have long felt a deep interest in the Temperance Cause, and have often wished that we had the power to banish the Demon intemperance from the land.” [“Our Paper.” The Temperance Star 3 (6 Jan 1870): 3.]

• But with the next issue it was back to monthly: “It is with feelings of regret that we are compelled to announce to our readers that we must change our paper back to a monthly again. This is the third time we have started a semi-monthly edition, and have been obliged to change it back to a monthly again. The fact is as soon as we start a semi-monthly edition, the people stop subscribing, the cause we are not able to explain, but if they do not want it but once a month, of course we shall have to comply with their wishes.” [“Our Paper.” The Temperance Star 3 (20 Jan 1870): 7.]

• Temperance, however, appears not to have paid: “We hardly know what to say in regard to our paper. We have made many changes since we commenced the publication, with the hope of gaining a larger circulation, but have failed to accomplish the work; we commenced the publication fo the Temperance Star, with the anti[c]ipation of receiving aid from Temperance societies, but it decreased them ten percent. Of course this will not do, and consequently we have deemed it necessary to make another change, or throw up our paper entirely. We have therefore com[m]enced a little Semi-Monthly Journal, for Sunday-Schools, and the fire-side, and we hope to have success with this change, it will contain no advertisements, and will be devoted to the interest and benefit of the young.” [Editorial. The Youth’s Guide 1 (7 April 1870): 3.] Hart did include an advertisement in the next issue, apologetically.

• Things were looking up: “We are glad to say that our little paper is gaining grounds, [sic] it seems to suit people better than ever before, and we think the late impro[v]ement will prove successful.” [Editorial notice. The Youth’s Guide 3 (21 April 1870): 7.]

• But looks were deceiving, and the editor got blunt: “It is with feelings of deep regret that we announce to our readers that this is the last number of the Guide. We can publish it no longer. We have lost over three hundred dollars in trying to sustain our paper, and we can lose no more. We have never had a circulation large enough to make it pay, and to-day, our circulation is only about one third as large as it was a year ago, and instead of increasing it decreases with every number. Now how can we publish a paper with such a result? Our circulation has been nearly six hundred, but to-day it does not exceed two hundred, and this number will reduce it nearly fifty more. [Note: ie, subscribers were due to renew subscriptions] It costs us twenty-five dollars a month to publish it. We have received but fifteen subs[c]riptions since the first of April, and five of them have not paid yet. Is not this encourageing? [sic] Now does not this look as though our readers took a deep interest in the enterprize? does it not look as though they had tried hard to sustain our little paper? ‘Well,’ says one, ‘if you had not failed up so many times, I should have subscribed for your paper, and tried to get others to subscribe for it, but I could not depend upon it, and so I did not try to do anything.’ Well, how could we help but fail, if every one has done as you have? and we have no doubt the most of them have been doing just the same as you have. But we have failed for the last time. All subscribers will receive their just dues back, just as soon as we can procure the means.” [“Our Last Issue.” The Youth’s Guide 3 (12 May 1870): 11.]

source of information: AASHistPer, series 5

available: AASHistPer, series 5

Boys’ Journal ; July 1868-after 1871?

edited by: A. B. Mereness, 1870 • Mereness Brothers, 1871

published: Martinsburg, NY: A. B. Mereness, 1868, 1870. • Martinsburg, NY: Mereness Brothers, 1871.

frequency: monthly

description: 1868: price, 20¢/ year

• 1870: 8 pp.; page size, 18″ h x 12″ w; price, 25¢/ year

• 1871: 12 pp.; octavo; 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 900. 1871, 1,700

source of information: notice; Rowell; Hough

bibliography:

• Notice. Now & Then 1 (Oct 1868): 3.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 697. [google books]

• Geo. P. Rowell & Co.'s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 100. [loc.gov]

• Franklin B. Hough. History of Lewis County, New York. Syracuse, NY: D. Mason & Co.; p. 113-114. [archive.org]

The Guiding Star: A Sunday Paper for Boys and Girls ; 4 July 1868-1873

edited by: Caroline A. Soule

published: New York, NY: Caroline A. Soule; 1870-1872, publisher at 119 Nassau St.

• Cincinnati, OH: 1871-1872

frequency: semimonthly

description: Page size, 16.5″ h x 24″ w

• Prices: 1 copy, 75¢/ year; 10 copies or more, 50¢/ year, each

• Circulation: 1872, 11,600

• Religious focus: Universalist

source of information: Student and Schoolmate; OCLC; Rowell; Eddy

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography: Advertisement. The Student and Schoolmate. 23 (April 1869): inside front cover.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 704. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 124. [archive.org]

• Richard Eddy. Universalism in America. Boston: Universalist Publishing House, 1886; vol 2, p. 598. [google books]

Little Messenger ; July 1868-1 Aug 1873

cover/masthead: 1869

edited by: Aug 1872-Aug 1873, W. H. Hinkley

published: Philadelphia, PA: General Convention of the New Jerusalem in the United States of America; 1869, publisher at 537 North 22nd St.

frequency: 1 vol/ year • OCLC: monthly; NUC: semimonthly; Nov 1869, semimonthly

description: 1869: 4 pp; page size, 12.75″ h x 9.25″ w

source of information: 15 Nov 1869 issue; OCLC; NUC

Boys’ and Girls’ New Monthly Magazine ; July 1868-

published: Nyack, NY: W. B. Corning, jr.

description: octavo • Aug 1868 is vol 1 #2

source of information: Lyon; NUC

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 245.

Good Words for the Young ; Nov 1868-Oct 1872

edited by: Norman Macleod, 1868-1869

• George MacDonald, 1869-1872

published: Philadelphia, PA: J. P. Lippincott & Co., 1869-1872; 1870, publisher at 515 & 517 Market St.

• Material originated in London, England

frequency: monthly

description: 1872, 56 pp.; page size, 10″ h x 7″ w; price, $2.50

continued by: Good Things for the Young of All Ages

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; American Literary Gazette ; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Notes on Books and Booksellers.” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 13 (15 Oct 1869): 378-379.

• “Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 37 (30 Oct 1869): 2.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 736. [google books]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: Good Words for the Young.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872): 6.)

The Minnesota Pupil ; Dec 1868-1869 • The Minnesota Pupil and Youth’s National Gazette ; 1870-after 1872

cover/masthead: 1869

edited by: Charles R. Hatch & Herbert H. Hatch

published: Minneapolis, MN: Hatch Brothers

frequency: 1868-1869, semimonthly; 1870-1871, weekly (Saturday); 1872, monthly

description: 4 pp. Page sizes: 1868-1871, 23″ h x 17″ w; 1872, 22″ h x 15″ w. Prices: 1868-1871, 1 copy, $1/ year; 1872, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1869, 5,000 (from paper). 1870, 5,400. 1871, 11,700. 1872, 2,500

relevant quote: The publishers weren’t shy about talking up their publication: they informed potential advertisers that it was the “best medium for advertising in the State; a paper of high moral tone; clubs free with all standard papers and magazines no objectionable advertisements taken.” [Men ; p. 676]

source of information: AASHistPer, series 5; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 676, 826. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory for 1872. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 87, 288. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory for 1873. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 116. [google books]

The Young Folks’ News ; Dec. 16, 1868-after 1882

cover/masthead: 1872

edited by: 1870 & 1872, Henry Reeves • 1880, Helen J. Hicks

published: Philadelphia, PA: Alfred Martien. 19 Sept 1868, office at 54 N. 6th St.; 24 Dec 1868, office at 21 S. 7th St. early 1869, office at 21 S. 7th St.; 2 Dec 1869, office at 1214 Chestnut St. 1870 & 1872, office at 1214 Chestnut St.; 1880, office at 621 Jayne St.

• Henry Reeves also appears as publisher in 1869.

frequency: weekly: Wednesday

description: 4 pp.; described in Rowell for 1869 as 8 pp.

• 1868, price, 50¢/ year

• 1869, price $1/ year

• 1870: page size, 26″ h x 18″ w

• 1872: page size, 26″ h x 17″ w; price, $1/ year

• 1880: page size, 24″ h x 17″ w; price, $1.25/ year

• Circulation: 1870 & 1872, 9,000 • 1880, over 5,000

relevant information: Mentioned in Rowell, 1882

• Martien had been a book publisher; he resumed book publishing in 1869 after purchasing the stock and copyrights of James S. Claxton. [“Notice.”]

relevant quotes: In early ads, Martien promised something for everyone: “It will be a sheet of four pages, handsomely illustrated, secular in character, and will be adapted for Young People of all grades. Special pains will be taken to render it attractive and popular; and practised writers will see that our Young Friends are not disappointed in their weekly feast of good things. Stories written with point, and conveying some moral lessons, Sketches of the Animal Kingdom, Wonders of Many Lands, Incidents of Travel, Facts of Science, Anecdotes, Charades, Puzzles, Poetry, Wit, and Original and Humorous Articles for Declamation, are among the things of interest that will be provided.” [Advertisement. New York Evangelist 39 (24 Dec 1868): 5.]

• The advantage of a weekly periodical, Martien pointed out, was that “[i]t is better to have one’s heart gladdened fifty-two times a year than only twelve.”[Advertisement. New York Evangelist 39 (24 Dec 1868): 5.]

• “The first number of this new Weekly for the Young Folks was issued in December last. … [I]ts circulation now ranks with that of our most popular Juvenile Periodicals.” [advertisement. Our Schoolday Visitor 13 (Aug 1869): advertising section]

source of information: NUC; OCLC; Rowell; notices & advertisements (below)

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Advertisement. Medical and Surgical Reporter 19 (19 Sept 1868): 240.

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 39 (24 Dec 1868): 5.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 99. [archive.org]

• “Reviews and Book Notices.” Medical and Surgical Reporter 20 (2 Jan 1869): 12.

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 40 (7 Jan 1869): 5.

• “Notice.” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 13 (15 July 1869): 160.

• Advertisement. Our Schoolday Visitor 13 (Aug 1869): advertising section.

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 40 (16 Dec 1869): 5.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

• Notice. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 17 (2 Oct 1871): 318.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 160. [archive.org]

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 44 (11 Dec 1873): 5.

• Advertisement. The Independent 26 (20 Aug 1874): 12.

• Advertisement. Arthur’s Illustrated Home Magazine 42 (Dec 1874): 546.

• Advertisement. Arthur’s Illustrated Home Magazine 44 (Dec 1876): 696.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1880; p. 333. [google books]

• Obituary of Henry Reeves. New York Observer and Chronicle 79 (21 March 1901): 371.

The Little Folks ; 1869-1877

edited by: Edward Eggleston

published: Chicago, IL: Adams, Blackmer & Lyon Publishing Co.

frequency: monthly, for weekly distribution on Sunday

description: 8 pp.; page size, 9.25″ h. Price: 30¢/ year

• Circulation, 1872, 22,000

relevant quote: Description: “It is an Illustrated Paper, for every Sunday, for Infant Scholars. Each weekly number contains a cut, and two original stories by the editor.” [Advertisement. The Independent 21 (9 Dec 1869): 6]

source of information: Independent ; Lyon; AAS catalog; OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Advertisement. The Independent 21 (9 Dec 1869): 6.

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 43 (19 Dec 1872): 5.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 32. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 255-256.

The Youth’s Cabinet ; 1869-1871

edited by: S. L. Cuthbert

published: Pittsburgh, PA: S. L. Cuthbert.

frequency: 1869-1870, monthly; 1871, weekly

description: 1869-1870: 8 pp.; size 24″ h x 19″ w; price, 60¢/ year

• 1871: price, $1/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 1,500

source of information: Rowell

bibliography:

• Notice. The Practical Farmer 3 (1 Sept 1869): 140.

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 738. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 406; online at UNT Digital Library

Golden Hours ; Jan 1869-1880

cover/masthead: 1869-1871

edited by: 1869-1871, Isaac W. Wiley; S. W. Williams, assistant editor

• 1872-1874, Erastus Wentworth; S. W. Williams, assistant editor

• 1875-1876, Erastus Wentworth; S. W. Williams; H. V. Osborne

• 1876-1880, Daniel Curry; H. V. Osborne

published: Cincinnati, OH: Hitchcock & Walden. Chicago, IL: Hitchcock & Walden. St. Louis, MO: Hitchcock & Walden.

• New York, NY: Carlton & Lanahan.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1869: 48 pp.; large octavo; page size untrimmed, 9″ h x 6.5″ w; price, $2/ year

• 1871: 54 pp.; page size untrimmed, 9″ h x 6.5″ w; price, $2/ year

• 1872: 52 pp.; large octavo; $2/ year

• Circulation, 1872, 11,000

• Religious focus: Methodist Episcopalian

relevant quotes:

• On the founding: “The General Conference of 1868 authorized the book agents at Cincinnati, O., to publish ‘a first-class illustrated monthly magazine for children and youth.’ ” [“Golden Hours”]

• The first year, the editor established the magazine’s personality: “We now close the first volume of the Golden Hours. We look back over the year’s labor and anxiety, and glance through the successive numbers, and feel like congratulating ourselves and our readers over what has certainly been quite a successful year; at least many of our friends and readers tell us so. We had many things to study and to experiment with in getting our little magazine fairly launched in the world. … We think our young friends have been able to see that, as we went along, we were gradually settling into a magazine of general interest, treating of a great variety of sujbects, and adapted to boys and girls ranging from about ten to fifteen years of age. Every number has contained something for all ages between these extremes, and even something to be read by the older brothers and sisters to the ‘wee ones.’ We have given you a large variety, history, science, natural history, tales, poetry, selections from English magazines, and translations from German magazines.” [1 (Dec 1869): 575]

source of information: Dec 1869, Jan-Dec 1871 issues; Maxwell; Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. Christian Advocate 44 (14 Jan 1869): 16.

• “Editor’s Table.” The Ladies’ Repository 29 (Feb 1869): 160.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 140. [archive.org]

• “Golden Hours.” In Matthew Simpson. Cyclopaedia of Methodism, 5th rev. ed. Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1883; p. 414. [google books]

Checklist of Children’s Books, 1837-1876, comp. Barbara Maxwell. Philadelphia, PA: Special Collections, Central Children’s Department, Free Library of Philadelphia, 1975.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Young Minnesotian ; 19 April 1869-6 Dec 1870

edited by: 19 April-14 Dec 1869, G. M. Naylor • 19 April-27 July, 10 Aug-14 Dec 1869, F. M. Reid

• 10 Aug 1869-22 Feb 1870, W. E. Winn & C. J. Wright

published: Minneapolis, MN: Minnesotian Printing Co.

frequency: weekly: Tuesday

description: 4 pp.; page size, 21″ h x 14″ w; price, 75¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 1000?

relevant information: In a list of amateur periodicals in Thomas G. Harrison, The Career and Reminiscences of an Amateur Journalist, and a History of Amateur Journalism (Indianapolis, IN, 1883; p. 27. [google books]).

source of information: Sportsman ; Rowell; Catalogue ; online catalog of Minnesota State Historical Society

bibliography:

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 676. [google books]

• Advertisement. The Young Sportsman 1 (Jan 1870): 8.

Catalogue of the Library of the Minnesota Historical Society. St. Paul, MN: The Pioneer Press Company, 1888; vol 2, p. 832. [google books]

Scattered Seeds ; Fifth month (May) 1869-1935

cover/masthead: 1871 | 1872

edited by: 1871-1872, L. H. Hall?; at Box 681, West Chester, PA

published: West Chester, PA: First Day School Association of Philadelphia.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1870: 8 pp.

• 1871: 4 pp.; quarto; page size untrimmed, 12″ h x 9″ w; price, 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10 copies, each 40¢/ year; 20+ copies, each 30¢/ year

• 1872: 16 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.25″ h x 6.5″ w; price, 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10 copies, $4/ year; 20 copies, $7/ year

• Religious focus: Society of Friends (Quaker)

relevant quotes: Description: “Six pages are devoted to Juvenile literature, illustrated by appropriate cuts, and two opages to First-day School matters. Its success the first year exceeded our expectaions, but to meet expenses it will require a circulation of at least 4000 copies, which is much beyond its present issue. That number has been directed to be printed on the responsibility of the Association, and it is necessary that subscribers be found for them.” [“Scattered Seeds.” Friends’ Intelligencer 27 (28 May 1870): 8]

• On the new page size, 1872: “We hope our readers will like our new garb. It will certainly be more convenient, and will be in better shape for binding. We intend to present the usual variety of good reading matter, and good illustrations. Some of our patrons are still desirous that we should publish Scattered Seeds weekly or semi-monthly. We must still answer, we would be glad to do so, but cannot while our present issue does not sustain itself. Aid us all you can friends by sending in clubs, single names and contributions for the cause.” [“Our New Volume.” 4 (Fifth month, 1872): 15-16]

source of information: 1871-1872, scattered issues; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Scattered Seeds.” Friends’ Intelligencer 27 (28 May 1870): 8.

• “Appeal to ‘Friends’ and Other Friends of the Colored People.” Friends’ Intelligencer 41 (20 Sept 1884): 503.

• advertisement. Friends’ Intelligencer 66 (11 Sept 1909): 1.

Zion’s Hope ; 1 July 1869-1972

edited by: 1900, Mrs. M. Walker • 1917, Ethel I. Skank

published: Lamoni, IA: Herald Publishing House.

frequency: weekly

description: page size, 7″ h x 5″ w • for young children

• The Hope was enlarged in 1886: “Zion’s Hope for November 29[, 1886] came out in an enlarged form and illustrated, making it more attractive.” [History; vol 4, p. 668]

• vol. 49 #33 is 13 Aug 1917

• Religious focus: Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

relevant quote: The Saints’ Herald, the denominational paper, announced the founding of Zion’s Hope in its 1 July 1869 issue; the 15 June 1869 issue explained more: “Every friend of progress in the church, every lover of the truth, every father, every mother, every brother, every sister, is materially affected by the teaching and training of the children of the household to which each separately belongs. A corner or column of the Herald is insufficient to meet the great want felt in this direction, and to give success to any new enterprise engaged in by us as a people, it is requisite that the object for which we especially strive in that enterprise be worthy and the effort persistent.” [in History; vol 3, p. 528]

source of information: Bauer; History; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

The History of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Independence, MO: Herald, House, 1967; vol 3, 4, & 7.

• Carolyn J. Bauer and Sharon P. Muir. “Visions, Saints and Zion: Children’s Literature of the Mormon Movement.” Phaedrus 7 (Spring/Summer 1980): 30-38.

Onward ; Jan-June 1869 • Mayne Reid’s Magazine Onward ; July 1869-Feb 1870

edited by: Thomas Mayne Reid; Charles Ollivant, assistant editor

published: New York, NY: G. W. Carleton, Jan-June 1869; publisher at 119 Nassau St.

• New York, NY: Mayne Reid, July 1869-Feb 1870.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: Jan-June 1869: Jan, 86 pp.; Feb, 94 pp.; March, 86 pp.; April-May, 90 pp.; June, 92 pp. Page size, 8.5″ h x 5.25″ w. Price: 1869, $3.50/ year

• Stories, poems, and serialized novels apparently for teenagers

relevant quotes:

• On the prospectus: “ … We have before us the Prospectus of a new enterprise of the kind [ie., a juvenile periodical], to be edited by Capt. MAYNE REID, and published by CARLETON, of New York. Its title is ‘Onward.’ We trust it will be so, and that it will carry to our homes, not light, trashy literature, but such as will tend to better prepare the little readers for the battle of this life, and to point out to them the path which leads to that which is to come. The Prospectus opens thus bravely;—‘ “ONWARD” along the track of civlization—on toward goodness and glory—a finger-point, pointing to all that is worthy of attainment—a guide to conduct the youth of America along that path leading to the highest and noblest manhood: such is the design of MAYNE REID’s Magazine.’ ” [“Notes on Books.” Medical and Surgical Reporter 19 (21 Nov 1868): 426]

• Another editor was less impressed: “There is nothing very remarkable about the magazine, on the whole; but it is tolerably attractive, and is well printed and fairly illustrated.” [Review. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868): 6]

source of information: Jan-June 1869 bound vol; American Phrenological Journal ; Lyon; Kelly; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Notes on Books.” Medical and Surgical Reporter 19 (21 Nov 1868): 426.

• Review. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868): 6.

• “Reviews and Book Notices.” Medical and Surgical Reporter 20 (2 Jan 1869): 12.

• “New Publications.” Massachusetts Ploughman and New England Journal of Agriculture 28 (6 March 1869); 2.

• Advertisement. American Phrenological Journal 49 (April 1869): 168.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 77. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 261.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Bright Side ; July 1869-abt Nov 1871 • The Bright Side and Family Circle ; Dec 1871-after 29 June 1873

cover/masthead: 1870 | 1871

edited by: C. G. G. Paine, 1872

published: Chicago, IL: John B. Alden & Co.; printed by Church, Goodman & Donnelley? (printers at 108 & 110 Dearborn St), July 1869-1870?. 1869: publisher also listed as Alden & True

• Chicago, IL: Bright Side Co., 9 Feb 1871-1873?; at 154 Washington St., 1871

frequency: 1869-early 1870: monthly

• late 1870: also available in weekly or semimonthly editions

• 1871: available in weekly or semimonthly editions

• 1872: monthly

description: March 1870: 16 pp. (includes 3 pages of advertising); page size, 13″ h x 9.5″ w • 12 Aug 1871: 8 pp.; quarto; page size untrimmed, 12.5″ h x 9.5″ w • 1872: 8 pp.; page size 26″ h x 20″ w • 1873, 11.75″ h

• Prices: 1869: 25¢/ year. • early 1870: monthly, 50¢/ year; single copy, 5¢. • late 1870: monthly, 25¢/ year; semimonthly, 50¢/ year; weekly, $1/ year. • 1871: weekly, 1 copy, 3¢ $1/ year; semimonthly, 25¢/ year. • 1872: 50¢/ year

• March 1870 is vol 2 #3 (whole number 9) • AAS copies: vol 1 #1 (July 1869)-vol 3 #55 (6 April 1871); vol 3 #58 (27 April 1871); 29 June 1873 issue of Bright Side and Family Circle is vol 5 #26 (whole #119), which makes it appear that this title is an extension of The Bright Side

• Feb 1870: 20,000 copies printed

• Circulation, 1872, abt 5,000

• Beginning with the March 1870 issue, the periodical was electrotyped, “so we can print as they are wanted.” [2 (March 1870: 16]

• The masthead changed on 9 Feb 1871: “Something new in our head—paper’s head, we mean—this week. We hope it is but a symbol of what occurs to our individual heads every day! Those neat, vine-bordered ovals, we intend shall be pretty enough and good enough to notice every week.” [3 (9 Feb 1871): 6]

relevant quote: “Unexcelled in beauty. The cheapest paper in the world. Vigorous and lively. Thoroughly Christian. … The largest circulation of any children’s paper or magazine in the world, considering the length of time published.” [The Children’s Hour (Oct 1870): inside back cover]

• The Chicago Fire forced the merger of Bright Side with a periodical titled the Family Circle: “The Bright Side and the Family Circle … have been consolidated since the fire, and now appear in attractive form, under the editorial management of Mr. C. G. G. Paine, and the business management of the ‘Bright Side Co.&38217; ” [“The Magazines”]

source of information: Saturday Evening Post ; March 1870, 9 Feb 1871, 12 Aug 1871 issues; Children’s Hour; Golden Hours; AAS catalog; Rowell; “The Magazines”

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Advertisement. Saturday Evening Post 4 Sept 1869: 7.

• Advertisement. The Children’s Hour (Oct 1870): inside back cover.

• Advertisement. Christian Union 2 (19 Nov 1870): 305.

• Advertisement. Golden Hours, 3 (June 1871): p. 2, advertising section.

• Advertisement. Christian Advocate 46 (8 June 1871): 184.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: The Bright Side.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872): 6.)

Sunday School Companion ; Jan 1869-1904

published: Chicago, IL: Holy Family Sunday School Association.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 10.25″ h • Religious focus: Catholic

source of information: OCLC; ULS

available: AASHistPer, series 5

The Young Crusader (also Young Crusader) ; Jan 1869-Oct 1875?

edited by: 1872, William Byrne

published: Boston, MA

• Bound volumes: Boston, MA: Kivlan & Cashman, 1869-1872. Boston, MA: the Young Crusader Office, 1874. Boston, MA: J. Cashman, 1876.

frequency: monthly

description: 1870-1872: 32 pp.; page size, 9.75″ h x 7″ w

• Prices: 1870, 50¢. 1872, $1

• Circulation: 1872, 5,000

• Religious focus: Catholic

source of information: NUC; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 666. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

The Young American ; April-Dec 1869

edited by: J. E. Baker; F. W. Breed, jr; W. H. Marvin; W. P. Dean; Porter Norton

published: Buffalo, NY: Young American.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 11.75″ h • Amateur publication

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; NUC

bibliography:

• “Our Letter Bag.” Oliver Optic's Magazine: Our Boys and Girls 5 (12 June 1869): 383.

Der Jugend-Pilger (Youth pilgrim); 1870-1914?

edited by: 1870-1895, Wilhelm Mittendorf • Arndt lists later editors

published: Dayton, OH: Publishing House of the United Brethren in Christ Church, 1870-1914.

frequency: 1870-1874, monthly; 1874-1914, semimonthly

description: Religious focus: United Brethren in Christ

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979): 27-31.

The Infants’ Delight (also Infants’ Delight) ; 1870-after Jan 1872

published: Boston, MA: Lee & Shepard.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: Page size, 8.25″ h • Intended for small children: large font size

source of information: Lyon; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 256.

The Little Watchman ; 1870-1876

edited by: Levi H. Dowling, 1870-1872

• Levi H. Dowling & Knox P. Taylor, 1876

published: Chicago, IL: W. W. Dowling, 1870-1872.

• St. Louis, MO & Indianapolis, IN, 1875.

• Bloomington, IL: Leader Company, 1875.

frequency: 1871, semimonthly; 1872, weekly & monthly; 1874, weekly & monthly

description: 1870-1871, 4 pp.

• 1872: weekly, 8 pp.; monthly, 32 pp.; page size, 32″ h x 22″ w; prices: weekly, 50¢/ year; monthly, 75¢/ year

• Circulation, 1872: weekly, 5,000; monthly, 1,000

• Religious focus

relevant quotes: One notice calls it “a little paper for little people.” [Notice of Morning Watch]

• The Chicago Fire (Nov 1871) destroyed the offices and the subscription books: “The Subscription Books were all destroyed, and so we have no means of ascertaining the status of our accounts with former subscribers, and we are compelled to depend upon them for information, which we trust will be forwarded to us at once. … All persons knowing themselves indebted to the Editor, will confer a favor, that will long be remembered, by remitting the amount at once. Brethren, don’t take advantage in this time of peril.” L. H. Dowling, however, took advantage of the time to revamp the paper (and raise the price). [Dowling]

relevant information: Dowling reused the name Little Watchman in 1891, when he purchased and renamed the Christian Sunday School Teacher.

• Levi H. Dowling published The Aquarian Age Gospel of Jesus, the Christ of the Piscean Age—a purported complete life of Christ which includes his formative travels through India and Tibet—in 1908.

source of information: Scott; Rowell; Bodenhamer; Campbell; Holloway; Notice of Morning Watch

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

bibliography:

• W. R. Holloway. Indianapolis. Indianapolis, IN: Indianapolis Journal Print, 1870; p. 162. [google books]

• Notice of The Morning Watch. The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 52 (May 1871): 366.

• L. H. Dowling. “The Great Chicago Fire and the Little Watchman.” Christian Standard 6 (9 Dec 1871): 389.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• Advertisement. Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1874; p. 451; copy online at UNT Digital Library

• R. A. Campbell. Campbell’s Gazetteer of Missouri, rev. ed. St. Louis, MO: 1875; p. 714. [google books]

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois. N. p.: Franklin William Scott, 1910; p. 31, 102

• David J. Bodenhamer and Robert G. Barrows. The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1994; p. 1182. [google books]

The Pacific Youth ; 1870-

edited by: Collins Brothers, 1871

published: San Francisco, CA: W. C. Forde & Co.

• San Francisco, CA: Collins Bros., 1871.

frequency: weekly

description: Page size, 13″ h

• 15 June 1871 is new series vol 1 #22

source of information: OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

L. P. Fisher’s Advertisers’ Guide [for the Pacific Coast]. San Francisco, CA: L. P. Fisher, 1870; p. 112. [archive.org]

Pictures and Stories ; 1870-

published: Nashville, TN

source of information: Kelly

bibliography:

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Young Folks’ Monthly ; 1870-1883

published: Chicago, IL: H. N. F. Lewis.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 15.25″ h

source of information: Lyon; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 252.

The Young Sportsman ; 1870?-after April 1872

published: Portsmouth, NH: W. L. Terhune, Frank L. Howard, Reed Campbell.

frequency: monthly?

description: Amateur publication • Newspaper format

• April 1872 is vol 3 #3, old series

source of information: OCLC

bibliography:

• “Editorial Correspondence.” Oliver Optic's Magazine: Our Boys and Girls 8 (2 July 1870): 432.

The Young Sportsman ; Jan 1870-?

edited by: Edwin Farwell

published: Boston, MA

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 11.75″ h

source of information: AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 5

The Little Corporal’s School Festival ; Jan-July 1870 • The School Festival (also National School Festival) ; Aug 1870-1874

edited by: April 1871-March 1873, Alfred L. Sewell; Mary B. C. Slade

• April 1873-, T. A. Hutchins; Mary B. C. Slade

published: Chicago, IL: Sewell & Miller, Jan 1870-Jan 1871.

• Chicago, IL: Alfred L. Sewell & Co., 1871-1872.

• East Boston, MA: n. p., April 1873-?

frequency: quarterly: Jan, April, July, Oct

description: 36 pp.; page size, 7.75″ h; price: 1 copy, 15¢ 50¢/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 10,000

relevant quotes:

• Announcement: “This beautiful magazine, devoted entirely to School Exhibitions, Dialogues, Tableaux, Recitations, etc., is ready for January. All are delighted with it. It is just what is needed by every teacher and every scholar.” (Little Corporal)

• Later advertisements described the contents more fully: “ ‘THE SCHOOL FESTIVAL’ is a beautiful original quarterly Magazine, devoted to new, sparkling Dialogues, Recitations, Concert, Motion, and other Exercises for Sunday School and Day School Exhibitions, Concerts, ‘Public Days,’ &c. … Needed by all teachers and pupils.” (Golden Hours)

Like The Little Corporal, the School Festival endured some setbacks due to the Chicago Fire of 1871, including the destruction of both the Oct 1871 issue, but the magazine’s subscription list: “Though burned out by the Great Fire, and our October Number being destroyed before being mailed, THE FESTIVAL is going ahead,—the October Number has been reprinted, and the destroyed plates of the back numbers are to be replaced, so that we can furnish back numbers as usual. As our subscription list was burned, subscribers will please write and claim what is due them and send on their subscr[i]ption for the next year.” [advertisement. The Little Corporal 13 (Dec 1871): cover page 2 (inside front cover)]

source of information: Little Corporal; Golden Hours; AAS catalog; OCLC; NUC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The School Festival.” The Little Corporal. 10 (Jan 1870): 12.

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870): 38.

• “Book Notices.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 24 (March 1871): 114.

• Advertisement. Golden Hours, 3 (June 1871): p. 2, advertising section.

• “Book Notices.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 24 (Sept 1871): 342.

advertisement. The Little Corporal 13 (Dec 1871): cover page 2 (inside front cover)

• Notice. Oneida Circular 9 (29 April 1872): 140.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 32. [archive.org]

Work and Play ; Jan 1870-March 1872

edited by: Mrs. H. L. Bridgman

published: Boston, MA: Milton Bradley & Co.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 16 pp.; quarto; page size, 11.25″ h x 8″ w

• Circulation: 1870, 3,000

absorbed by: The Little Corporal ; July 1865-April 1875

relevant quote: The merger with the Corporal was announced in that magazine’s April 1872 issue: “By an arrangement made with the publishers, Milton Bradley & Co., Springfield, Mass., the publication of [Work and Play] will hereafter be discontinued, and its subscribers will be supplied with the Little Corporal for the unexpired term of their subscription. … Work and Play was established with the express purpose of ‘increasing the interest in rational and instructive home amusements and occupations throughout the country.’ The work accomplished and the reputation achieved by this magazine in the peculiar field to which it was devoted, has been very great, and much good has resulted. Considering the character and excellence of Work and Play, the Corporal thinks he has obtained a distinguished recruit—and he welcomes all the friends of that magazine to the ranks of his great army with the assurance that he will do everything in his power to make it profitable and pleasant to them. We are glad to announce in this connection that Uncle Raphael will continue his excellent articles on Drawing, which had become so popular in Work and Play. The first of these articles will appear in the next number of the Corporal. Now for a vigorous campaign!” [Corporal 14 (April 1872): 154] Beginning with the May 1872 issue, the puzzle column in the Corporal, which had been called “Private Queer’s Knapsack,” was retitled “Work and Play.”

source of information: Little Corporal; OCLC; Lyon; Men Who Advertise

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 669. [google books]

• Editorial announcement. The Little Corporal, 14 (April 1872): 154.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 308-312.

The Pious Youth ; Jan 1870-Dec 1871

edited by: H. R. Holsinger

published: Tyrone, PA: H. R. Holsinger.

• Dale City, PA: H. R. Holsinger, Oct-Nov 1871.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1870, 16 pp.; page size, 10.5″ h

• 1871, 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; price, $1

• Circulation: 1870, 1,000; 1871, 1,500

• Religious focus: Church of the Brethren

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

The Men Who Advertise. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 739. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 152. [archive.org]

Our Leisure Moments ; Feb 1870-1900s

edited by: Albert C. Ives; Frederick Samuel Dellenbaugh

published: Buffalo, NY

frequency: monthly

description: Octavo • Amateur publication

source of information: OCLC

American Boy’s Magazine (also Philadelphia Monthly) ; June 1870-May 1872

published: Philadelphia, PA

frequency: monthly

description: Vol 1-2 #6 (1870-Feb 1872) as Philadelphia Monthly

source of information: NUC

The Young Catholic ; Oct 1870- after 1872

edited by: I. T. Hecker

published: New York, NY: Catholic Publication Society.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 13.75″ h; price, $2

• Circulation: 1872, 50,000

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 129. [archive.org]

Young Folks’ Rural ; Nov 1870-1881

edited by: H. N. F. Lewis

published: Chicago, IL: H. N. F. Lewis, 1870-1872.

• Chicago, IL: J. D. Tallmadge & E. B. Tallmadge, 1881.

frequency: monthly

description: 1872, 16 pp. • Page size, 17.75″ h

• Prices: 1870, $1/ year; 1872, $1.50/ year • Sept 1872 is vol 3 #1 (whole #22)

relevant quotes:

• The magazine was “designed to Cultivate a Taste for Rural-Life among the Young People of both Country and City.” [advertisement. Christian Union 19 Nov 1870: 2]

• One editor describes the magazine as a boys’ magazine: “It was full time that country boys had a better paper than are most that are published for them.” [“Book Notices, &c.” Southern Planter and Farmer 5 (Jan 1871): 62]

• A description: “An interesting monthly of sixteen pages and 64 columns. The number before us contains numerous articles on various topics, such as appear to be well adapted not only for the amusement, but likewise for the instruction, of the young.” [Notice. American Journal of Pharmacy. Oct 1872: 480]

relevant information:

• H. N. F. Lewis edited the Western Rural, for adults.

Young Folks’ offered “cash prizes” for “best ‘compositions’ ”—presumably, from its subscribers. [advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer Oct 1872: 9]

source of information: Christian Union; Southern Planter and Farmer; Lyon; AAS

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. Christian Union 19 Nov 1870: 2.

• “Book Notices, &c.” Southern Planter and Farmer 5 (Jan 1871): 62.

• advertisement. Christian Union 4 Jan 1871: 3.

• advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer Oct 1872: 9.

• notice. American Journal of Pharmacy. Oct 1872: 480.

• advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer Dec 1872: 9.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 32. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 252.

The Little Schoolmate ; Dec 1870-Jan 1876; May 1876?

cover/masthead: 1872-1873

edited by: New York Catholic Protectory

published: West Chester, NY: New York Catholic Protectory.

frequency: Dec 1870-1875, monthly; May 1876, semimonthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 28″ h x 21″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 4,000

• Religious focus: Catholic

relevant information: Edited and printed by boys, who ran the presses for the Protectory.

source of information: AASHistPer, series 5; Rowell; “Charity”

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Notice. De la Salle Monthly 5 (Aug 1871): 99. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 135. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory for 1873. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1873; p. 245; online at UNT Digital Library

• Advertisement for press of Boys’ Catholic Protectory. Sadliers’ Catholic Directory, Almanac, and Ordo … for 1875. NY: D. & J. Sadlier & Co., 1875; “Publishers and Booksellers,” p. 37. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory for 1875. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1875; p. 253; online at UNT Digital Library

Trow’s New York City Directory … for the Year Ending May 1 1877, comp. H. Wilson. NY: Trow City Directory Company, 1876; p. 44. [google books]

• “A Great Catholic Charity.” Notre Dame Scholastic 9 (25 March 1876): 470; online at University of Notre Dame Archives

• Thomas C. Middleton. “Catholic Periodicals Published in the United States.” Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia. N.p.: American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia, 1908; vol 19, p. 35. [google books]

Our Little Friend ; about 1871

published: Mountain View, CA

source of information: Kelly

bibliography:

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Loving Words for Children ; 1871-after 1872

edited by: E. Payson Hammond

published: Boston, MA: Willard Tract Repository.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; 9″ h x 7″ w; price, none

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• The editor apparently planned for the magazine to make no money for anyone associated with it: “[M]any papers are published just to make money, but that is not the object of this paper. No one is to receive any pay at all for their writings or labors for it.” [in Little Corporal]

• The magazine took no advertisements. In place of listing a subscription price, the editor requested donations: “But how will it live in this material world, if it takes ‘no pay? ’ Well, we notice a little note at the end of the last page, which says, ‘All donations in aid of the circulation of this paper will be acknowledged in the succeeding number, giving the initials of the donor. All communications should be addressed to Charles Cutler, 18 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass.’ ” [Little Corporal]

source of information: Rowell; Little Corporal

bibliography:

• “ ‘Loving Words for Children.’ ” Little Corporal 12 (Feb 1871): 65.

• “Our Exchanges: Loving Words for Children.” Home Guardian 33 (1 July 1871): 215.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

Happy Hours ; 1871-1872

edited by: O. A. Roorbach

published: New York, NY: O. A. Roorbach; publisher at 102 Nassau St. New York, NY: Happy Hours Company, 1872; publisher at 22 Ann St.

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; price, 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 5 copies, $1/ year

• Circulation, 1872, 6,000

source of information: Youth’s Companion ; Christian Union

bibliography:

• Advertisement. The Youth’s Companion 44 (19 Jan 1871): 24.

• Advertisement. Christian Union 3 (12 April 1871): 225.

• Advertisement. Christian Union 5 (24 Jan 1872): 103.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 126. [archive.org]

Apples of Gold ; 1871-1917

published: Boston, MA: Hurd & Houghton, for the American Tract Society.

frequency: weekly

description: printed in color

relevant quote: “For youngest readers the American Tract Society provides Apples of Gold, the first volume of an illustrated weekly, which is rendered doubly attractive by its generous type and abundant engravings.” [“Juvenile Books.” The Independent 21 Nov 1872: 6.]

relevant information:

• Intended for “infant classes.” [notice. Christian Union 13 Dec 1871: 382.]

• The bound volume for 1872 was available for $1. [advertisement. The Independent 17 Oct 1872: 6.

source of information: Independent; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1874 only)

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Independent 17 Oct 1872: 6.

• “Juvenile Books.” The Independent 21 Nov 1872: 6.

• notice. Christian Union 13 Dec 1871: 382.

Every Boy’s Magazine ; 1871-

edited by: William Rideing; 1871, 4 Province Court

published: Boston, MA

frequency: monthly

description: 1871 price, 50¢/ year

relevant quotes:

• “A new monthly periodical, called Every Boy’s Magazine, is to be published here [Boston], by Mr. W. H. Rideing, the first number to appear with the new year. As its name implies, it will be devoted to the entertainment of boys, and will be published at the low price of fifty cents per year. the proprietor has had considerable experience in connection with magazines and newspapers in England and in this country, and is likely to make his new venture valuable and popular.” [“Literary News.” The Literary World 1 (1 Jan 1871): 126]

• “The Cheapest Magazine in the Country.” “As its name implies, EVERY BOY’S MAGAZINE is a periodical for youth of all ages, and it well fulfills the comprehensiveness of its title. In it boys will find all their diversified interests well attended to. Writers of the first rank contribute to its pages, and while it does not claim to be a religious paper, its purpose is to elevate, instruct, and make better.” (advertisement, Little Chief, Feb 1871)

source of information: Little Chief; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Literary News.” The Literary World 1 (1 Jan 1871): 126.

• Advertisement. Little Chief. 5 (Feb 1871): inside back cover.

Der Kinder-Bote (Children’s messenger); 1871-?

edited by: A. O. Brickmann

published: Philadelphia, PA

frequency: monthly

description: Sunday-school paper of the Church of the New Jerusalem

• Religious focus: Swedenborgian

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979): 27-31.

Little Christian ; 1871-1904?

published: Boston, MA: H. L. Hastings.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 14″ h x 11″ w; price, 25¢

• May be supplement for The Christian (1866-after 1872); published by itself, however, by 1872

• Religious focus

source of information: NUC; OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• Advertisement. New York Evangelist 51 (30 Dec 1880): 7.

• Notice. Christian Union 29 (10 April 1884); 358.

Our Little People ; 1871-1934

published: Nashville, TN: Whitmore & Smith

description: 7.25″ h • for children 6 to 8 years old

• Religious focus

continued by: Primary Class

source of information: Batsel; NUC

Lutherisches Kinder- und Jugendblatt (Lutheran children’s and young people’s paper); Jan 1871-Dec 1938

edited by: L. W. Dorn; Johann Paul Beyer

published: St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, Jan 1871-Dec 1938.

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; quarto

• Organ of the German Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Missouri, Ohio, and other states

• Religious focus: Lutheran

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979): 27-31.

The Little Missionary ; 1871-after 1906

edited by: Amadeus Abraham Reinke

published: Bethlehem, PA: Henry T. Clauder.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 21″ h x 14″ w; price, 30¢/ year

• Religious focus: Moravian

source of information: Rowell; Levering; Stocker; Proceedings

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1874-1876 only)

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 151. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory for 1877. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co.;, 1877; 264. [google books]

• Joseph Mortimer Levering. A History of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1741-1892. Bethlehem, PA, 1903; p. 713. [archive.org]

• Harry Emilius Stocker. A History of the Moravian Church in New York City. NY: n. p., 1922; pp. 301-302. [archive.org]

Proceedings of the Society for Propagating the Gospel Among the Heathen, for the Year Ending August 23, 1906. Bethlehem, PA: Society for Propagating the Gospel Among the Heathen, 1906; p. 13. [archive.org]

The Children’s Paper ; Jan 1871-after 1873

published: Dayton, OH: Henry J. Kurtz.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 21″ h x 15″ w. Price: 1871, 40¢/ year; 1872-1873, 30¢/ year

• Religious focus: United Brethren in Christ

source of information: Rowell

bibliography:

• Advertisement. The Gospel Visitor 21 (Jan 1871); back cover (cover page 4). [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 143. [archive.org]

• Advertisement. Western Reserve Chronicle 57 (13 Nov 1872): 1; online at Library of Congress Historic American Newspapers

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1873; p. 173. [google books]

The Sunday-School MagazineChurch School Magazine ; Jan 1871-Dec 1931

edited by: 1872, A. G. Haygood

published: Nashville, TN: Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Jan 1871-Dec 1931.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; price, $1

• Circulation: 1,200

• Religious focus: Methodist Episcopal

source of information: OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 173. [archive.org]

Young Israel (also Libanon) ; Jan 1871-1900?

edited by: Louis Schnabel; Morris Brecher

published: New York, NY: L. Schnabel & M. Brecher, the Hebrew Orphan Asylum Printing Establishment.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 9.5″ h • Oct 1875-May 1878: includes Libanon, German supplement

• Religious focus: Jewish

continued by: Israel’s Home Journal

source of information: NUC; OCLC

bibliography:

• Naomi M. Patz and Philip E. Miller. “Jewish Religious Children’s Literature in America: An Analytical Survey.” Phaedrus 7 (Spring/Summer 1980): 19-29.

Morning Light ; Jan 1871-

published: New York, NY: American Tract Society.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 10″ h. Price, 8 copies, $1; 100 copies, $12.00

• Intended for “infant classes and young readers”

• Religious focus

continues: Our School and Our Home

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; notices (below)

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. Reformed Church Messenger 37 (25 Jan 1871): 8.

Young Folks Journal (also Little Things); March 1871-May 1874

published: Brinton, PA

frequency: monthly

description: Amateur publication

source of information: NUC

Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper ; 1 Oct 1871-15 Dec 1873

edited by: E. C. Allen

published: Augusta, ME: E. C. Allen & Co.

frequency: semimonthly

description: 8 pp.; quarto; page size, 15.75″ h x 11″ w; price, $1/ year

• Circulation: Oct 1871 (from magazine), 1,000,000 copies; 15 Dec 1871 (from magazine), 500,000; 1872, 330,000

• In 1871-1872, each issue included an engraving and biography of “distinguished scholars” in various high schools, mostly in Augusta; the column was similar to one appearing in 1872 in Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly.

relevant quote: The second issue promised great things: “Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper [h]as now been before the public long enough for us to ascertain how well we have succeeded in catering to please the young people, and old people, too, who have young hearts. We are very much flattered at our success at getting up the paper, which we are assured by thousands of subscribers in all parts of the country, is just such a publication as they have long desired, and will patronize as long as it is kept up to its present standard. We assure all that our efforts shall be untiring, and our money shall be expended without stint, for all necessary purposes ever to make Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper, the most interesting, useful, entertaining, and elevating young folks’ publication in the world.” [1 (15 Oct 1871): 12]

continued by: The Maine State Magazine

source of information: Oct 1871-Aug 1872, scattered issues (located in Winterthur Library, Wilmington, DE); Lyon; AAS catalog; OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Notice. Maine Farmer 39 (17 June 1871): 2.

• Notice. Maine Farmer 39 (19 Aug 1871): 2.

• Notice. Maine Farmer 39 (28 Oct 1871): 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 67. [archive.org]

• E. Rowell. “The Press of Kennebec County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; p. 99. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 313-315.

Child’s Friend ; 1871?-after 1873

edited by: C. G. G. Paine

published: Chicago, IL: Bright Side Company.

frequency: probably semimonthly (Rowell says monthly, but The Advance disagrees)

description: 1872: 4 pp.; page size, 19″ h x 13″ w; price, 25¢/ year

source of information: Notice; Rowell; Scott

bibliography:

• Notice. The Advance 5 (28 Dec 1871): 5.)

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: The Bright Side.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872): 6.)

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois, 1814-1879. Collections of the Illinois State Historical Library, vol 6, Bibliographical Series, vol 1. Springfield, IL: Illinois State Historical Library, 1910; p. 110. [archive.org]

Boys’ Ledger ; 1872-1873?

edited by: Percy W. Thompson

published: Washington, DC: Percy W. Thompson.

description: price, 25¢/ year

relevant information: Amateur periodical

source of information: Kelly; “Amateur Papers”

bibliography:

• “Amateur Papers.” Oliver Optic's Magazine: Our Boys and Girls 13 (April 1873): 286.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Der Kinderfreund (The children’s friend); 1872-1874?

edited by: J. B. A. Ahrens

published: New Orleans, LA: J. B. A. Ahrens.

frequency: monthly

description: Organ of the German Methodist Church, Southern Louisiana Conference

• German-language periodical

• Religious focus: Methodist

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979): 27-31.

Our Little Ones ; 1872-1931 • Story World ; 1931-after 31 Aug 1969

published: Philadelphia, PA: American Baptist Publication Society.

• Later issues: Valley Forge, PA: American Baptist Board of Education and Publication.

frequency: weekly

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

Der Schutzengel (The guardian angel); 1872-1875?

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; large quarto

• Religious focus: Roman Catholic

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979): 27-31.

What Next? ; March 1872-1874

published: Chicago, IL: John B. Alden.

frequency: monthly

description: price, 30¢/ year

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; advertisement

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. Christian Union 6 (6 Nov 1872): 399.

The Young Cadet ; Aug 1872-

edited by: Willett Hyatt

published: Poughkeepsie, NY: Willett J. Hyatt.

description: Newspaper format • Amateur publication

source of information: OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

The Young Folks Gem ; Nov 1872-after Oct 1873

published: Wadsworth, OH: John Clarke.

• Sharon Center, OH: John Clarke.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 7.75″ h • Newspaper format • Amateur publication: “A journal for the young folks and old folks with young hearts”

source of information: NUC; AAS catalog; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

The Laurel Wreath ; 1872?-after 1874

edited by: William Worth Dowling, 1874

published: Indianapolis, IN: William Worth Dowling.

frequency: quarterly

description: 1874 is vol 3

source of information: AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 5

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