boy, dog, and magazine

NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN CHILDREN’S MAGAZINES

(Updated 2014)
the other bibliographies

American Children’s Periodicals, 1789-1872

histories & analyses | works on individual titles

Titles of children’s periodicals are linked to their descriptions in American Children’s Periodicals, 1789-1872


General works & works on more than one periodical (alphabetical)

Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941): 131-136.

A survey of selected periodicals from 1789 to 1873, with a number of errors.

Jane Benardete and Phyllis Moe. Companions of Our Youth: Stories by Women for Young People’s Magazines, 1865-1900. NY: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., 1980.

Selected from Youth’s Companion, Our Young Folks, and St. Nicholas.

Diana A. Chlebek. “ ‘Child’s Pleasure-Garden’: Nineteenth-Century American Children’s Magazines and the Concept of Childhood Autonomy.” In The Image of the Child, ed. Sylvia Patterson Iskander. Battle Creek, MI: Children’s Literature Association, 1991. pp. 107-111.

Jan Cohn. “The Civil War in Magazine Fiction of the 1860’s.” Journal of Popular Culture 4 (1970): 355-82.

Lorinda B. Cohoon. Serialized Citizenships: Periodicals, Books, and American Boys, 1840-1911. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 2006.

Includes discussion of works in Youth’s Companion, Young Americans’ Magazine of Self-Improvement, and Our Young Folks.

John B. Crume. “Children’s Magazines, 1826-1857.” Journal of Popular Culture 7 (1973): 698-706.

[Mary Mapes Dodge.] “Children’s Magazines.” Scribner’s Monthly July 1873: 352-4. online

Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979): 27-31.

German-language children’s magazines printed in the Americas from 1843 to the early 1900s.

Lesley Ginsberg. “Of Babies, Beasts, and Bondage: Slavery and the Question of Citizenship in Antebellum American Children’s Literature. In The American Child, ed. Caroline E. Levander and Carol J. Singley. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. pp. 85-105.

Includes discussion of pieces from The Juvenile Miscellany, Robert Merry’s Museum, and The Slave’s Friend.

Alice I. Hazeltine. “Attics, Barns and Cellars.” Massachusetts Library Association Bulletin June 1936: 37-8.

About collecting early children’s magazines.

Holly Keller. “Juvenile Antislavery Narrative and Notions of Childhood.” Children’s Literature, 24 (1996): 86-100.

Examines anti-slavery works, including books, The Juvenile Miscellany, and Slave’s Friend. Keller debunks several popular but incorrect notions about American children and works for them.

R. Gordon Kelly, ed. Children’s Periodicals of the United States. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Analytical essays on every important American magazine for children. The essay on Merry’s Museum could be better, but others are first rate; an appendix lists most periodicals published for children in the U. S. (with a few errors).

R. Gordon Kelly. Mother Was a Lady: Self and Society in Selected American Children’s Periodicals, 1865-1890. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1974.

Magazines include St. Nicholas, Youth’s Companion, and Our Young Folks.

Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Selections from magazines including The Little Pilgrim, The Little Corporal, and Student and Schoolmate.

Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942.

Mary D. Manning. “ ‘Trust Not Appearances’: Admonitory Pieces from Two Tennessee Juvenile Periodicals of the 1850s.” University of Mississippi Studies in English 5 (1984-1987): 131-139.

About The Children’s Book of Choice & Entertaining Reading for the Little Folks at Home and the Youth’s Magazine.

James Marten. “For the Good, the True, and the Beautiful: Northern Children’s Magazines and the Civil War.” Civil War History 41 (March 1995): 57-75.

A descriptive survey.

Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography April 1899: 133-6.

Goldie Platner Merrill. “The Development of American Secular Juvenile Magazines: A Study of the Educational Significance of Their Content.” PhD diss. U of Washington, 1938.

Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (January/February 1939): 55-60.

Justin G. Schiller. “Magazines for Young America: The First Hundred Years of Juvenile Periodicals.” Columbia Library Columns 23 (1974): 24-39.

A descriptive survey with many errors.

Jill Delano Sweiger. “Conceptions of Children in American Juvenile Periodicals: 1830-1870.” PhD diss. Rutgers University, 1977.

Includes The Juvenile Miscellany, Youth’s Companion, Robert Merry’s Museum, Parley’s Magazine, and Child’s Friend and Family Magazine.


Works on individual titles

Works included here include notices and reviews of the time, and later histories and analyses, organized by subject. Individual titles are arranged in chronological order; items for each title are in rough chronological order. Brief pieces are transcribed on this page.


The Boys’ & Girls’ Magazine & Fireside Companion | The Child’s Magazine (New York, NY) | The Child’s Newspaper | The Child’s Paper | Children’s Friend (Albany, NY) | Children’s Friend (Dayton, OH) | The Children’s Hour | The Children’s Magazine (1789) | The Favorite | Garland | The Genius of Youth | The Juvenile Key | The Juvenile Lyceum | The Juvenile Magazine | The Juvenile Miscellany | Juvenile Rambler | Juvenile Reformer & Sabbath School Instructor | Juvenile Watchman | The Juvenile Wesleyan | The Little-Pig Monthly | The Little Pilgrim | The Little Wolverine | The Lyceum Banner | Monday Express | Our Young Folks | Parley’s Magazine | Robert Merry’s Museum | The Rose Bud (Lowell, MA) | The Rose Bud (Charleston, SC) | The Sabbath School Monitor | The Sabbath School Repository (Dover, NH) | The Schoolmate | Slave’s Friend | The Student | The Student and Schoolmate | Sunday School Advocate | The Young People’s Book | Youth’s Banner | Youth’s Cabinet; Woodworth’s Youth’s Cabinet | Youth’s Companion | Youth’s Friend and Scholar’s Magazine | Youth’s Friend (Cincinnati, OH) | Youth’s Gazette | Youth’s Literary Gazette | Youth’s Magazine: A Monthly Miscellany | Youth’s Magazine and Juvenile Harp | Youth’s Medallion | Youth’s Monthly Visitor | Youth’s Penny Paper | Youth’s Temperance Advocate | Youth’s Temperance Lecturer | The Youth’s Temperance Visitor

The Children’s Magazine (Jan-April 1789)

• Notice. Connecticut Courant (Hartford, CT). 2 (Feb 1789): p. 3, col 3.

THIS DAY PUBLISHED
And to be Sold by Hudson and Goodwin,
Calculated for the Use of Families and Schools.
For JANUARY 1789.
(To be continued Monthly.)

Each Number of this work will contain 48 Pages, duodecimo, printed on good paper and letter, and will be sold at Four Shillings and Six-Pence a dozen, or Six Pence a single number.

hand pointing rightThis work is designed to furnish Children, from seven to twelve years of age, with a variety of lessons on various subjects, written in a plain, [neat?], familiar style, and proper to lead them from the easy language of Spelling-Books up to the more difficult style of the best writers. Teachers of Schools have long complained of the want of such a work, and the Publishers are happy that they are now enabled to furnish it at a small expence.


Teacher’s Offering; or Sabbath’s Scholar’s Magazine • Teacher’s Offering; or Sunday Scholar’s Magazine • Youth’s Friend, and Scholar’s Magazine (Nov 1823-1843?)

• Review. American Journal of Education, 2 (February 1827): 127-128. Ed. William Russell

The Youth’s Friend and Scholar’s Magazine. Vol. III. (for 1826) 24mo. pp. 194. Published by the American Sunday School Union.

This miniature periodical is well worth the attention of parents and teachers. Its contents are, mostly, short addresses on religious subjects, with conversations, narratives, and anecdotes of the same character. Occasionally there is given an illustration of such passages of scripture as require elucidation from geography or natural history; and a well executed cut usually accompanies the articles in this department.

The work is intended chiefly for Sunday schools; but it furnishes so much interesting and instructive matter, directly conducive to moral and religious improvement, that it is equally well adapted to the use of other schools and of families.

The editing of this publication indicates, on the whole, much acquaintance with the disposition and habits of children, and a happy talent for engaging their attention, and impressing their minds. Every number of such a work, however, cannot be equally successful; and, in some, there seems to be too large a proportion of doctrinal matter. But the guidance of attentive parents

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p. 128

and teachers, will enable children to obtain from the whole much valuable instruction.

The execution of most of the numbers is uncommonly neat and tasteful; and this circumstance is by no means unworthy of remark, when we advert to the singular cheapness of the work;—the cost of an entire volume of twelve numbers, each containing sixteen 24mos. pages, being only twenty-five cents.

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education. 2 (December 1827): 750. Ed. William Russell.

Among works of this class which it is interesting to take notice of at this season of the year, as closing a twelvemonth’s course of instruction and entertainment to the young, we would mention the Youth’s Friend, published in Philadelphia; the Juvenile Magazine, in Utica; the Children’s Friend, in Albany; and the Child’s Magazine, in New-York. These juvenile periodicals have been very successful during the year, and are daily extending the usefulness of Sunday schools.

To the above we would add the Juvenile Miscellany, published in Boston; which, though according to its title more miscellaneous in its character, has aimed steadily and successfully at the improvement of childhood.

A juvenile souvenir, by the intelligent editor of the last mentioned work, has just been published.

• “Literary Notices.” New-York Evangelist. 12 (9 January 1841): 6, col 4.

The Seasons, and The Youth’s Friend, are the titles of two works issued in beautiful style by the American Sunday School Union, and sold by Mr. Meeks, of this city. The first is attractively written, and derives choicest lessons from the changes and the varied aspects of the seasons. The other is a collection of the numbers of the valuable little periodical published under that title. The excellent moral character of the books needs no further guaranty than the endorsement of the pious and judicious Committee. A little item of news, we may take this occasion to say, which got into our columns a week or two since, respecting the formation of a Methodist Sunday School Union, may have conveyed a wrong impression. The American Union is, what its catholic name imports, an organization which brings its power to the promotion of good in all denominations of the Christian church. To guard against any appropriation of its influence to sectarian designs, its Committee of Publication consists of clergymen of five differen denominations, without the unanimous consent of whom no publication is issued. It embraces within its care and oversight the Sabbath schools of a still greater number of denominations. Its sole object is the doing of good to the young, and well has it exerted its influence for this end. It is deserving the confidence and support of Christians and patriots of every sect and section.


Children’s Friend (1826-1827?)

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education. 2 (December 1827): 750. Ed. William Russell.

Among works of this class which it is interesting to take notice of at this season of the year, as closing a twelvemonth’s course of instruction and entertainment to the young, we would mention the Youth’s Friend, published in Philadelphia; the Juvenile Magazine, in Utica; the Children’s Friend, in Albany; and the Child’s Magazine, in New-York. These juvenile periodicals have been very successful during the year, and are daily extending the usefulness of Sunday schools.

To the above we would add the Juvenile Miscellany, published in Boston; which, though according to its title more miscellaneous in its character, has aimed steadily and successfully at the improvement of childhood.

A juvenile souvenir, by the intelligent editor of the last mentioned work, has just been published.


The Juvenile Miscellany (1826-1836)

|all notices & reviews|

• Notice. American Journal of Education, 1 (September 1826): 569. Ed. William Russell. online

• Review. Masonic Mirror and Mechanic’s Intelligencer (Boston), 2 (September 9, 1826): 294 online

• Review. Christian Examiner, 3 (September & October 1826): 427-428. Ed. Francis Jenks. online

• Review. American Journal of Education, 1 (October 1826): 640. Ed. William Russell. online

• Review. Christian Intelligencer & Eastern Chronicle, 8 (5 December 1826): 195. online

• Review. American Journal of Education, 2 (March 1827): 191. Ed. William Russell. online

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education. 2 (December 1827): 750. Ed. William Russell. online

• Review. Ladies’ Magazine 1 (Jan 1828): 47-48. Ed. Sarah Josepha Hale. online

• Review. Christian Register (Boston), 7 (8 March 1828): 40; reprinted from the American & Gazette. online

• Review. Ladies’ Magazine, 1 (July 1828): 336. Ed. Sarah Josepha Hale. online

• Review. New-York Mirror, and Ladies’ Literary Gazette, 6 (2 August 1828): 25-26. online

• Review. Ladies’ Magazine 2 (Feb 1829): 95. Ed. Sarah Josepha Hale. online

• Review. American Annals of Education, 4 (July & August 1829): 383. Ed. James G. Carter. online

• Review. Ladies’ Magazine 2 (September 1829): 440. Ed. Sarah Josepha Hale. online

• Notice. American Monthly Magazine 1 (Dec 1830): 647. Ed. N. P. Willis. online

• “Juvenile Miscellany.” Christian Watchman, 14 (3 April 1833): 55. online

• “Items for Youth.” The Rose Bud. 1 (15 June 1833): 167. Ed. Caroline Gilman. online

• Notice. Southern Rose Bud, 3 (18 October 1834): 27. Ed. Caroline Howard Gilman. online

• Carolyn L. Karcher. “Lydia Maria Child and the Juvenile Miscellany: The Creation of an American Children’s Literature.” In Periodical Literature in Nineteenth-Century America, ed. Kenneth M. Price and Susan Belasco Smith. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 1995.

• Holly Keller. “Juvenile Antislavery Narrative and Notions of Childhood.” Children’s Literature, 24 (1996): 86-100.

• Etsuko Taketani. “The ‘Omnipresent Aunt’ and the Social Child: Lydia Maria Child’s Juvenile Miscellany.” Children’s Literature, 27 (1999): 22-39.


Youth’s Gazette (13 Jan 1827-)

• “New Publication.” Masonic Mirror and Mechanics’ Intelligencer 3 (20 Jan 1827): 30.

New Publication.—We have seen the first number of a little newspaper proposed to be published weekly in this city, by Messers. T. B. Wait & Son, the enterprising publishers of the american Journal of Education, entitled the Youth’s Gazette. The editorial department is under the superintendance of the editor of the Journal of Education, a gentleman eminently qualified to make the work entertaining and useful. The Gazette is designed expressly for youth, and as such it may become a valuable acquisition to the means already in use for the diffusion of useful knowledge among that class of the community. The leading features in the plan proposed are.

1. To prevent extracts from recent publications for youth. This arrangement, it is thought, will be more useful than that of giving formal reviews or notices, to guide the parent or child in making such selections as they would prefer, when disposed to purchase works of this sort.

2. To furnish recent or interesting articles in those departments of science which naturally claim the attention of youth. Geography, history, biography, natural history, and various other branches entertaining and useful to the young, will here be the chief objects of attention.

3. To present a brief view of political and general intelligence foreign and domestic.

4. To select suitable reading for the improvement of hours not otherwise occupied on Sunday.

To “teach the young idea how to shoot,” is surely a delightful task; yet we know of no situation in life, in which a man can be placed, where a greater responsibility rests upon him. Early impressions are not easily eradicated. “Just as the twig is bent, the tree’s inclined,” is a maxim which should be deeply impressed on the minds of those engaged in the instruction of youth, and should have its weight in influencing their conduct. When arrived to manhood, the youth will look back with pain or pleasure on the early admonitions and examples of his preceptor. By them he will be actuated and governed in his transactions through life; and by them led on to virtue or vice.

The same responsibility rests on the conductor of a publication avowedly intended to promote the purposes of education. And in receiving his paper into the domestic circle, and placing it in the hands of our children, we entrust to him the sacred cause of giving a proper direction to their morals, and inculcating those sentiments, maxims and precepts, that are to govern them in manhood, and render them useful or worthless members of society. We have full confidence in the editor of the Gazette, and hazard nothing in recommending his paper as worthy of patronage.


The Juvenile Magazine (1827-1828)

• Notice. American Journal of Education, (November 1827): pp. 699-700. Ed. William Russell.

WESTERN SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, NEW-YORK.

[The Annual Report for Sept. 1827, contains among other things indicative of the usefulness and the prosperity of the above institution, the following intelligence.]

The Juvenile Magazine, which we promised in our last report, commenced with the present year. It has had, such as it is, more than the anticipated success. We circulate three thousand copies. The young readers take a lively interest in it. Of the usefulness to the children of such a publication, there can be but

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p. 700

one opinion. In our last report, we stated that it was not our idea to make it exclusively religious. It has, therefore, contained various topics of general intelligence, and, in the language of children, has attempted to inculcate useful principles of different descriptions.


Youth’s Companion • Youth’s Companion and Sabbath School Recorder • Youth’s Companion (1827-1929)

• “New Year’s Present.” Boston Recorder. 15 (8 December 1830): 194.

What more acceptable or useful New Year’s Present than the Youth’s Companion? It is cheap, one dollar a year; it affords a constant variety of interesting and profitable reading for children; and its crowning excellence is, that it does not grow old, cease to impart pleasure, and fall into neglect after a few days; but it returns fresh and bright with every returning week throughout the year. We have no personal interest in the Companion, as we have no share in the editing or publishing of it; but we think it confers a lasting benefit on every family of children which it visits. It is published at this office.

• C. A. Stephens. “When The Youth’s Companion was Young,” in Stories of My Home Folks. Boston: Perry Mason Company, 1926.

Stephens (who also wrote for Robert Merry’s Museum) recalls his early career with The Youth’s Companion, in the early 1870s.

Youth’s Companion, ed. Lovell Thompson. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1954)

Selections from the first 100 years, with history; illustrated.


The Child’s Magazine (1827-after 1848)

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education. 2 (December 1827): 750. Ed. William Russell.

Among works of this class which it is interesting to take notice of at this season of the year, as closing a twelvemonth’s course of instruction and entertainment to the young, we would mention the Youth’s Friend, published in Philadelphia; the Juvenile Magazine, in Utica; the Children’s Friend, in Albany; and the Child’s Magazine, in New-York. These juvenile periodicals have been very successful during the year, and are daily extending the usefulness of Sunday schools.

To the above we would add the Juvenile Miscellany, published in Boston; which, though according to its title more miscellaneous in its character, has aimed steadily and successfully at the improvement of childhood.

A juvenile souvenir, by the intelligent editor of the last mentioned work, has just been published.


The Juvenile Reformer and Sabbath School Instructor • Journal of Reform (1830-1837)

• “Items for Youth.” The Rose Bud. 1 (15 June 1833): 167. Ed. Caroline Gilman.

The “Sabbath School Instructor,” from Portland, Maine, has appeared in a new and improved form, and is graced by communications from Mrs. Sigourney.

“The Youth’s Literary Gazette” in Philadelphia, “The Juvenile Rambler" and “Parley’s Magazine” in Boston, are all conducted with great spirit, and form a new and interesting era in Juvenile Literature.

The terms of each are one dollar per annum.

None of the above publications, however, can excel the “Juvenile Miscellany,” which still maintains its just claims to the patronage of parents and children. It has been regularly published for seven years.


Classical Journal and Scholar’s Review • Juvenile Rambler • Juvenile Rambler, or, Family and School Journal (1830-1833)

|all notices & reviews|

• “School Newspaper.” American Annals of Education. 2 (Jan 1832): 88. online

• Notice. Ladies’ Magazine 5 (Feb 1832): 92. online

• Review. The Juvenile Miscellany, 3rd series 2 (March/April 1832): 108. Ed. Lydia Maria Child. online

• “Juvenile Periodicals.” The Rose Bud. 1 (13 October 1832): 26-27. Ed. Caroline Gilman. online

• Notice. Christian Watchman. 14 (22 February 1833): 31. online

• “Items for Youth.” The Rose Bud. 1 (15 June 1833): 167. Ed. Caroline Gilman. online

• Humorous piece. Southern Rose Bud. 2 (19 October 1833): 31. Ed. Caroline Gilman online

• “Parley’s Magazine.” American Annals of Education. 4 (February 1834): 100. online

• “The Juvenile Rambler.” Southern Rose Bud. 2 (22 February 1834): 103. Ed. Caroline Gilman online

• “The Youth’s Penny Paper.” American Annals of Education. 9 (July1838): 335-336. Ed. William A. Alcott online


The Family Pioneer and Juvenile Key (1830-1837)

• Notice. Boston Recorder. 15 (October 20, 1830): 166.

The Juvenile Key. This is a very neat 7 by 9 weekly paper, published at Brunswick, (Me.) the mechanical execution of which is entrusted to two children, the one 7, the other 9 years old. We presume it will advocate the Working Men’s Party.


The Youth’s Temperance Lecturer (1832)

• “Juvenile Periodicals.” The Rose Bud. 1 (13 October 1832): 26-27. Ed. Caroline Gilman.

Since commencing our little work, we have become acquainted with two periodicals of a design very similar to our own. The first is a small monthly magazine, printed in New-York, and entitled The Youth’s Temperance Lecturer. The leading object of the Editor seems to be, to fortify his readers against acquiring habits of intemperance. But his design embraces other kindred

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p. 27

objects, and presents a very pleasing Miscellany of original matter, and choice extracts. The other work is entitled, The Juvenile Rambler, and is printed in Boston. We saw this paper for the first time last week, although it has reached the 37th number. It is remarkable that two persons entirely unconnected with each other should undertake plans so nearly alike, as the Rambler’s and our own. The Rambler, like the Rose Bud, is printed on a small quarto sheet, with three columns on a page, and is issued weekly. Its price is One Dollar perannum; that of the Lecturer seventy five cents. Both were commenced during the present season. Acknowledging these points of sympathy, and regarding the coincidences to which we have alluded as justifying our common objects, we tender to the respective Editors our sincere good will.


The Rose Bud (1832-1834?)

• “Singular Coincidence.” The Rose Bud. 1 (20 October 1832): 30. Ed. Caroline Gilman

Having been often complimented on the pretty and novel name of our newspaper, we were startled, and must confess, somewhat chagrined, when a friend, last week, brought us a monthly publication from Lowell, (Mass.) called “The Rose Bud,” with a vignette somewhat resembling our own, which we find has been in existence since last March. It is got up with great neatness, and seems happily designed for Sunday Schools. Though two great men, Leibnitz and Newton, claimed the same invention in mathematics, and disputed about it for years, we are disposed modestly to yield the right of priority to our Norther rival, while we maintain its originality with us. …


The Rose Bud, or Youth’s Gazette • Southern Rose Bud • Southern Rose (1832-1839)

• Notice. Ladies’ Magazine 5 (Sept 1832): 428-429. Ed. by Sarah Josepha Hale.

The Rose Bud” is the title of a periodical for young ladies recently issued in Charleston[,] S. C. Mrs. Gilman, well known for her excellent writings, both in verse and prose, in our “Juvenile Souvenirs,” is the Editor[.] There is no doubt but the publication will be made interesting and useful to the

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class for whom it is designed; but the TITLE is rather too sentimental. We are right glad, however, to find the fashion of editing is becoming frequent among ladies. We think they are the proper judges of the literary character which should be given to works designed for the young of their own sex, especially; and this includes the periodicals designed for the mother’s table as well as the daughter’s toilet. Mrs. Child was, we believe the first lady who attempted this delicate task. It is now about six years since the establishment of her “Juvenile Miscellany,” and she has nobly sustained it ever since. It is a valuable work, and has done much good in promoting education and will, we trust, long continue.

• Notice. The Rural Repository, August 31, 1833: 55.

The Southern Rose Bud.—The Rose Bud, an interesting little paper published at Charleston, S. C. which we have heretofore commended to the notice [o]f our juvenile friends, is about to be enlarged and improved, under the title of the Southern Rose Bud. It is still to be edited by Mrs. Gilman, under whose fostering care we trust it will continue to expand, and increase in beauty, until it shall have arrived at full perfection. The first number of the second volume will be issued in its new form on the 31st of August, at $1 per annum, payable in advance.

• “The Southern Rose Bud.” Ladies’ Magazine 7 (July 1834): 335-336. Ed. Sarah Josepha Hale.

• “The Rose-bud.” New-York Mirror 12 (8 Nov 1834): 151. Ed. by George P. Morris, Theodore S. Fay, & Nathaniel P. Willis.

The Rose-bud.—This pretty word has no connection in our present purpose with the garden of Messrs. Prince and Sons, or the perfumes and essences of Johnson & Co., exquisite as they both are, in their respective ways; but is the title of a charming little periodical edited by Mrs. Caroline Gilman, and published at Charleston, South Carolina, which we shall take occasion, hereafter, to introduce more ceremoniously to our readers.

• Notice. New-York Mirror 13 (23 Jan 1836): 239. Ed. George P. Morris, Theodore S. Fay, & Nathaniel P. Willis.

To our friends in South Carolina we owe much. … Without very animating encouragement either in praise or profit, she has scarcely made an attempt in periodical literature which has not disclosed high intellectual resources. Of one of her more recent enterprises in this way—the Rose-Bud—we sometime since did ourselves the pleasure to speak with the encomia it deserved. The-Rose Bud [sic] has, since then, grown into the Rose—The Southern Rose—and it keeps the promise of its loveliness in youth. It is still edited by a lady, its original projector, Mrs. Gilman—a fine writer herself, as well as a shrewd critick, and with an Ithureal-like perception of talent, however bashful and shrinking in others; she has, besides, an amiableness and an enthusiasm of disposition which stimulates her to tempt that talent forward, wherever discovered, and under the most inspiriting advantages. Hence, though capable of supplying treasures of prose and poetry from her own pen, which would give grace and character to any work, she has invoked around her the delicate spirits of her sunny home, and they have “come when she did call for them,” and made the bright region with their presence brighter. There is a list of female contributors to this valuable little two-dollar-a-year magazine, which would do credit to the best of those which make large pretensions. Among these contributors to The Southern Rose, Miss Martineau has several times appeared; and, in addition to the writings of the sisters, Florence and A. M. W. of Moma, Mary, and others, all evincing intelligence of a high order; to Mrs. Gilman we are, if we have observed aright, entirely indebted for eliciting the first efforts of a youthful poetess whose earlier contributions were subscribed “A Friend,” but who has since distinguished herself over the signature of M. E. L. At some future time we will offer evidence to our readers that we do not over-rate this young lady in predicting for her, if she proceeds as she has begun, great eminence. Of the gentlemen writers who have enriched this miscellany, we have not the leisure to say more than that Bulfinch of Augusta, Georgia, and several others of fine taste and powers; not the least attractive of whom is the Rev. Mr. Gilman, the husband of the lady-editor, whose prose, valuable as it is, will scarcely exceed in excellence his poetry, if he can always throw off stanzas as unaffected and as touching as those in the second number of the present volume so sweetly descriptive of “The Silent Girl.”

• “The Southern Rose.” American Annals of Education, (April 1837): 190. Ed. William A. Alcott & William C. Woodbridge

The Southern Rose, Charleston, S. C.

This is a semiweekly paper of eight octavo pages, intended for the young. It is rather light and amusing, but for the kind of periodical is exceedingly well conducted;—and its mechanical execution is almost unrivalled. If there be an objection in this department, it is that the type is too small. If it were a size or two larger, we believe the work would do more good.

• Janie M. Smith, “ ‘Rose Bud,’ a Magazine for Children.” The Horn Book Magazine. 19 (Jan 1943): 15-20.

• Jan Bakker. “Caroline Gilman and the Issue of Slavery in the Rose Magazines, 1832-1839.” Southern Studies, 24 (1985): 273-283.

Focuses on the magazines The Rose Bud, The Southern Rose Bud, and The Southern Rose.


Youth’s Literary Gazette (1832-1833)

• “Items for Youth.” The Rose Bud. 1 (15 June 1833): 167. Ed. Caroline Gilman.

The “Sabbath School Instructor,” from Portland, Maine, has appeared in a new and improved form, and is graced by communications from Mrs. Sigourney.

“The Youth’s Literary Gazette” in Philadelphia, “The Juvenile Rambler" and “Parley’s Magazine” in Boston, are all conducted with great spirit, and form a new and interesting era in Juvenile Literature.

The terms of each are one dollar per annum.

None of the above publications, however, can excel the “Juvenile Miscellany,” which still maintains its just claims to the patronage of parents and children. It has been regularly published for seven years.

• Notice. Southern Rose Bud. 2 (19 October 1833): 31. Ed. Caroline Gilman

The publishers of the “Youth’s Literary Gazette,” in Philadelphia, give notice, that they will transfer their subscription list to the publishers of “Parley’s Magazine,” in consequence of the increased number of publications of the same kind. We have received the series of the ‘Youth’s Literay Gazette,’ with great interest. Its invariable tendency has been to improve and please the youthful mind.


Parley’s Magazine (1833-1844)

|all notices & reviews|

• Review. The Ladies’ Magazine, and Literary Gazette. 6 (April 1833): 187. Ed. Sarah Josepha Hale.

online

• “Items for Youth.” The Rose Bud. 1 (15 June 1833): 167. Ed. Caroline Gilman. online

• Review. The Rural Repository. 10 (August 31, 1833): 55. online

• Review. The Ladies’ Magazine, and Literary Gazette. 6 (August 1833): 376. Ed. Sarah Josepha Hale. online

• “Parley’s Magazine.” American Annals of Education. 4 (February 1834): 100. online

• Notice. Southern Rose Bud. 2 (22 February 1834): 103. Ed. Caroline Gilman. online

• “Popular Periodicals.” American Annals of Education. (Jan 1835): 32-34. online

• Review. Eastern Magazine. 1 (July 1835): 64. Ed. Matilda P. Carter. online

• Review. American Annals of Education. 7 (February 1837): 96. Ed. William A. Alcott & William C. Woodbridge. online

• Notice. The Knickerbocker. 9 (January 1837): 100. Ed. Lewis Gaylord Clark. online

• “The Youth’s Penny Paper.” American Annals of Education. 9 (July 1838): 335-336. Ed. William A. Alcott. online

• Notice. Brother Jonathan. 1 (April 9, 1842): 409. Ed. Benjamin Park & Rufus Wilmot Griswold. online


Juvenile Watchman (1833-1835)

|all notices|

• Announcement. Christian Watchman. 14 (1 March 1833): 35, col 6. online

• Announcement of specimen. Christian Watchman. 14 (8 March 1833): 39, col 1. online

• Notice. Christian Watchman. 14 (3 April 1833): 54, col 6. online

• Publication of issue 2. Christian Watchman. 14 (26 April 1833): 67, col 2. online

• Publication of issue 3. Christian Watchman. 14 (3 May 1833): 70, col 6. online

• Publication of issue 4. Christian Watchman. 14 (17 May 1833): 79, col 4. online

• Publication of issue 23. Christian Watchman. 14 (4 October 1833): 159, col 2. online

• Publication of issue 26. Christian Watchman. 14 (11 October 1833): 163, col 2. online

• Close of volume 1. Christian Watchman. 15 (3 April 1834): 55, col 3. online

• Announcement of volume 2. Christian Watchman. 15 (11 April 1834): 59, col 3. online

• Publication of volume 2, issue 6. Christian Watchman. 15 (23 May 1834): 83, col 2. online

• “Juvenile Watchman.” Youth’s Companion. 8 (17 April 1835): 193. online


The Child’s Newspaper (1834)

• Notice. Western Monthly Magazine, 2 (February 1834): 107.

The Child’s Newspaper. Cincinnati: Corey and Fairbank.

A small sheet, very neatly printed, has just commenced making its semi-monthly appearance in this city, under the above title. It is edited by the reverend Thomas Brainerd, assisted by the reverend B. P. Aydelotte, under the supervision of a committee of the Cincinnati Sunday School Union, composed of four persons of different denominations. All this care seems to be taken to afford a pledge that the paper shall not have any sectarian bias.

There is no doubt on our minds of the great advantage of periodicals for children; which awaken their curiosity, give them the habit of reading, and furnish them with a stated supply of wholesome intellectual nourishment. The Child’s Newspaper is calculated to be a valuable auxiliary in the education of our western youth. The plan is a good one, and has so far been well executed, and we very cheerfuly and cordially wish it success.


The Slave’s Friend (April 1835-before April 1839)

• “A Disclosure—Incendiary Publications Destroyed.” Philadelphia Inquirer 13 (26 Aug 1835): 2, col 2.

• Notice. Youth’s Cabinet. 2 (16 May 1839): 78.

The Slave’s Friend.—A new and interesting Number has just been published. Price one cent.

• Holly Keller. “Juvenile Antislavery Narrative and Notions of Childhood.” Children’s Literature, 24 (1996): 86-100.

• Christopher D. Geist. “The Slave’s Friend: An Abolitionist Magazine for Children.” American Periodicals 9 (1999): 27-35.

• Deborah C. De Rosa. Domestic Abolitionism and Juvenile Literature, 1830-1865. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2003.

• Spencer D. C. Keralis. “Feeling Animal: Pet-Making and Mastery in the Slave’s Friend.” American Periodicals 2 (Fall 2012): 121-138.

• Paula T. Connolly. Slavery in American Children’s Literature, 1790-2010. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2013.


Youth’s Cabinet • New-York Teacher’s Lyceum • Woodworth’s Youth’s Cabinet • Woodworth’s Youth’s Cabinet and Uncle Frank’s Dollar Magazine (1837-1857)

|all notices & reviews|

• Notice. The Graham Journal, of Health and Longevity, 1 (May 2, 1837): 40. Ed. David Campbell. online

• Prospectus. Liberator. 7 (12 May 1837): 79, col 5-6.

• Notice. Liberator 7 (19 May 1837): 83, col 5. online

• Notice. Liberator. 7 (9 June 1837): 95, col 6. online

• Notice. The Slave’s Friend. #27 (1838?): cover p. 3 (inside back cover) online

• Review. The Liberator, 9 (May 10, 1839): 74. Ed. William Lloyd Garrison. Reprinted from the Herald of Freedom. online

• “Subscribers to the Missionary.” Youth’s Cabinet. 2 (3 October 1839): 158. Ed. Nathaniel Southard online

• Advertisement. New-York Evangelist. 12 (9 January 1841): 8, col 7. 12 (16 January 1841): 12, col 7.

• Advertisement. New-York Evangelist. 13 (6 January 1842): 4, col 7. 13 (13 January 1842): 8, col 7.

• Notice. New-York Evangelist. 16 (25 December 1845): 206, col 5. online

• Review. The Literary World, February 20, 1847: 59. Ed. Evert A. Duyckinck. online

• Review. The Biblical Repository and Classical Review, 5 (January 1849): 189. online

• “Periodicals for Youth.” Sunday School Advocate 13 (Feb 11, 1854): 78. online


The Juvenile Lyceum (21 Jan 1837-after 25 April 1837?)

• Review. American Annals of Education, (February 1837): 96. Ed. William A. Alcott & William C. Woodbridge.

There is a Juvenile Lyceum at New Brunswick, N. J. which meets weekly for declamation, discussion, and the reading of compositions. It has sixtyfour members[.] They have resolved, as an experiment, to publish, every Saturday, their proceedings, in the form of a small newspaper, at fify cents a year. We have seen the first nuber, and it is certainly worth notice. It contains the speeches of seven boys, in the discussion of the question, ‘What curiosity in the United States is the most interesting?’ It also contains several other agreeable and instructive articles. We have seldom seen more of the living voice in a juvenile newspaper;—and we heartily wish it success.


Youth’s Magazine: A Monthly Miscellany (New York, NY; 1838-1841?)

• Notice. Poughkeepsie Casket. 2 (28 July 1838): 63. Ed. J. H. Selkreg

The Youth’s Magazine,’ is the title of a small octavo periodical, published monthly by Mason & Lane, New-York, for the Methodist Episcopal Church. The number before us is sent forth as a specimen, with a promise that each succeeding one shall fully equal it. It contains forty pages, and is embellished with two wood engravings. Terms, $1 per annum.

The Magazine is intended for the moral and religious edification of youth in general, and of the Methodist church in particular. The Rev. Geo. Coles is editor, and while under his charge none can doubt its efficacy to do good. Such publications, properly conducted, are capable of doing an incalculable amount of good. While the larger and more elaborate publications of the day are exerting their moral influence upon those of a maturer age, the youth of our land, of both sexes, are denied, to a great extent, the direct benefit of their influence. But a work devoted specially to them, and in language and sentiment addressed directly to their hearts and understanding, will not only make them feel a pride in reading a work of their own, but will scatter a vast quantity of precious seed in rich and fertile soil.

• Notice. Poughkeepsie Casket. 3 (13 July 1839): 55. Ed. J. H. Selkreg

Youth’s Magazine.’—We omitted to notice at the proper time, the commencement of the second volume of this very valuable publication. It is issued monthly from the Methodist Book Establishement [sic], in New-York, and is under the editorial guidance of the Rev. George Coles. The current volume commenced in May, and although published under the auspices of a particular religious sect, yet it breathes but one kind of religion and morality—the religion and ethics of Christianity. We heartily commend it to parents of all denominations of Christians, as well as non-professors, as a most excellent moral instructor for their children. It is embellished with numerous engravings. The frontispiece to the first volume is a view of Millbrook, the residence of the late Dr. Adam Clarke. Price only one dollar per annum.

• Notice. Poughkeepsie Casket. 3 (14 December 1839): 143. Ed. J. H. Selkreg

Youth’s Magazine.—This valuable little periodical has now passed the sixth month of its second year of publication. The D[e]cember number is rich in its usual variety of moral and religious instruction, which always shine upon its pages, and embraces the following subjects: Trinity Church, (with a cut); Natural Theology—the Eye; The Drunkard’s Late Residence; The Study and Observation of Nature considered in reference to Music; Heaven; Arm, (with a cut); Charity; Apothegems, by L. E. L.; The Scenes of my Childhood; Taste, by Erastus Wentworth; The Poetry of Life; Obituary. Poetry—A Mother’s Love; Epitaph; From a Lady to her Son on a bed of sickness; On seeing the late John Wesley’s picture. Mason & Lane, New-York.—One dollar a year.


The Youth’s Penny Paper (1838)

• Notice. American Annals of Education. 9 (July 1838): 335-336. Ed. William A. Alcott

The Youth’s Penny Paper.

This little paper is published weekly at New York, by E. French, No. 146 Nassau Street. The price is fifty cents a year, twentyfive cents for

-----
p. 336

six months, twelve and half cents for three months, in advance; or one cent a week. The paper consists of four pages about the size of large octavo pages, and is edited by Theodore Dwight, Jr.

The Youth’s Penny Paper, says the prospectus, is designed to afford entertainment and instruction for the young; to aid them in their studies; to acquaint them with important passing events, as well as the events of seince; to inculcate religious and moral principles, to cultivate taste, and to prepare them for happiness and usefulness as members of society;—also, to assist parents and teachers in training the young. Each number, continues the prospectus, will contain one or more engravings; true tales or anecdotes, designed to improve the mind or character; sketches of real travel at home or abroad; a hymn or song, often with music; or short lessons on various departments of knowledge appropriate to different ages; with brief familiar notices of the news of the day.

We are glad to see such a paper, and from such a source; for what the tact, talent, and perseverance of anybody can do towards sustaining such a paper, we are sure will be done by its untiring editor and zealous publisher. And if they can find men of like spirit with themselves—men we mean who care for something besides money, and who labor, in part at least, for a higher and nobler reward—to act as agents, all over the country, we doubt not their labors will do much good. We do not say—we dare not hope it—that their paper will be popular; for what paper or journal whose main object was to do good, has ever been popular, in this country or in any other? What does not touch our consciences or invade our liberty—our liberty to do as we please with our time faculties and money, without regard to God—may be popular; at least if it espouses some party or sect.

We speak rather discouragingly on this subject, because we have had some experience in these matters. We were employed by the philanthropic proprietor of the ‘Juvenile Rambler,’ to edit that paper for him about two years, till it was merged in Parley’s Magazine. Subsequently we edited Parley’s Magazine four years—we will not say with what success—we leave that to others. We will only say that had we sailed under the flag of a sect or party, and had other people been as willing as ourselves to ‘work for nothing and keep themselves,’ we have no doubt both works would have been better supported than they were; and we might have been willing longer to bear the burden of editing the latter.

We ought, perhaps, to say, that Parley’s Magazine is published by Messrs Joseph S. Francis, of this city, and Charles H. Francis of New York; but who the editor is, we are not informed.


The Missionary (1839)

• “Subscribers to the Missionary.” Youth’s Cabinet. 2 (3 October 1839): 158. Ed. Nathaniel Southard

Subscribers to the Missionary.

For two reasons the subscriber has discontinued the publication of the “Missionary.” The expense was heavier than the income, and the Youth’s Cabinet, a very interesting paper, had beforehand entered into the same department of labor with the “Missionary.”

Subscribers to the Missionary will be supplied with the Youth’s Cabinet for six months, gratis, on condition they take the paper for one year, by paying Fifty Cents. The editor cannot but hope that his friends will be satisfied with this arrangement—when, instead of the Missionary once a month, the Youth’s Cabinet will visit them weekly through the year, for the small consideration of fifty cents.

Ebenezer McDowall.

—-
SPECIAL NOTICE.

I have promised to send the Youth’s Cabinet to the subscribers for the “Missionary,” who paid in advance only on cnodition that they each pay fifty cents to the subscriber, which will entitle them to this paper for one year. Those who do not choose to comply with this condition will please to return ths number with their name and post office marked on it.

N. Southard.


Youth’s Temperance AdvocateYouth’s Temperance Advocate and Band of Hope Recorder (1839-1860)

• “Value of a Temperance Paper.” Scientific American. 1 (9 October 1845): p. 1, col 2.

Value of a Temperance Paper.—In a certain town in Connecticut, where the Youth’s Temperance Advocate had been taken in the Sunday School, its discontinuance was advocated on account of expense. A poor woman said it must not be given up; and should not be, if she paid the ten dollars herself, and earned the money by washing; for, said she, I had rather do that than have the little paper discontinued, and my husband be what he was before that little paper came into my family.


The Sabbath School Monitor • Sunday School Monitor • Light Ship and Sabbath School Monitor (1840-1846 or 1847)

• Notice. Poughkeepsie Casket, August 22, 1840: 79. Ed. J. H. Selkreg

New Publications.—Sunday School Monitor. We have omitted to notice this valuable auxiliary to the Sabbath school cause. It is published by N. Southard at No. 9 Spruce street, New-York, in a folio form, every other Thursday, at the low price of fifty cents per annum. Twenty copies will be sent to one address for $5 in advance. We commend it the attention of the Sabbath schools of our village. Subscriptions will be received at this office. …

• Advertisement. New-York Evangelist. 12 (5 June 1841): 92, col 6.


Youth’s Magazine and Juvenile Harp (1841-)

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger, 5 (1 April 1842): 83. Ed. Edward Otheman

We have received numbers 1 and 2, volume XI., of the above-named juvenile periodical, published in Cincinnati, and edited by Mrs. H. E. B. Stowe. It has a variety of valuable selections, and some interesting editorial articles, adapted to the capacity and taste of children—with music for the young. With ourselves, the number of its correspondents appears to be sufficiently small. Published the 15th of each month, 24 pages a number, at 75 cents per year—or 50 cents each for 10 or more copies. S. W. Johns, printer and publisher.


The Sabbath School Repository (1841)

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger, 5 (17 Sept 1841): 31. Ed. Edward Otheman

Notices of Publication.

Number one of the Sabbath School Repository, a new monthly, in pamphlet form, has been received. It is published at Dover, N. H., by the Freewill Baptist connection, and contains a variety of interesting and valuable articles. We hail it as an auxiliary in the great and good cause of religious education. Let the minds of children and youth be well stored with religious truth, and we still have hope for our country. The usual terms. …


Robert Merry’s Museum (1841-1872)

|all notices & reviews|

• Review. Rural Repository, 18 (September 25, 1841): 63. online

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger, 5 (4 February 1842): 67. Ed. Edward Otheman. online

• Advertisement. Brother Jonathan, (12 February 1842): advertising cover, p. xxviii. online

• Review. The New-York Mirror, 20 (26 March 1842): 103. Ed. Daniel Fanshaw. online

• Notice. Brother Jonathan, 1 (16 April 1842): 437. online

• Notice. Ladies’ Pearl, 2 (May 1842): 462. Ed. Daniel Wise. online

• Notice. Scientific American, 2 (27 March 1847): 213. online

• Notice. Scientific American, 2 (29 May 1847): 287. online

• Notice. The Youth’s Casket, 1 (March 1852): 52. online

• Advertisement. The Youth’s Companion, (12 January 1865): 8. online

• Notice. American Literary Gazette, 9 (1 October 1867): 298. online

• Notice. American Literary Gazette, 10 (15 January 1868): 177. online

• Notice. Lowell Daily Citizen and News (Lowell, Massachusetts), 21 (7 February 1871): 2, col 1. online

A Noble Life: John N. Stearns. New York: National Temperance Society and Publication House, n.d.

Stearns edited the magazine from 1857 to 1866, shifting it in a unique direction.

• William H. Coleman. “The Children’s ‘Robert Merry’ and the Late John N. Stearns.” The New York Evangelist 16 May 1895: 19. online

Willie Coleman (born c. 1840; d. after 1920) was one of the most prominent subscribers to the Museum, so this reminiscence of one of its editors contains information about the magazine not available elsewhere.

• Death notice for Horace B. Fuller. The Publishers’ Weekly (21 January 1899): 56. online

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography April 1899: 133-6.

Matthews discusses the Museum and some of the magazines that merged with it on pp. 135-136.

• William Oliver Stevens. “ ‘Uncle’ Peter Parley.” St. Nicholas Nov 1925: 78-81. online

A piece of nostalgic condescension which is a good lesson in the dangers of defective memory. Online version is annotated.

• Frank Luther Mott. “Merry’s Museum.” In A History of American Magazines. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1930. Vol. 1: 713-715.

While the reference book is highly respected, this article contains factual inaccuracies on every page. Read it, but move on quickly to Dechert or Pflieger.

• Dorothy B. Dechert. “The Merry Family: A Study of Merry’s Museum, 1841-1872, and of the Various Periodicals that Merged with It.” MA thesis. Columbia University, 1942.

The most complete bibliographic study available, not only of the Museum, but of the many magazines that fed into it. Dechert had access to individual issues not commonly available. Astonishingly thorough.

• Madeleine B. Stern. “The First Appearance of a ‘Little Women’ Incident.” American Notes & Queries 3 (Oct. 1943): 99-100.

About “Cousin Tribulation’s” 1868 description of an incident rewritten for Little Women, which is online.

• John B. Crume. “Children’s Magazines, 1826-1857.” Journal of Popular Culture 7 (1973): 698-706.

Includes some analysis of the Museum, and of Parley’s Magazine.

• Justin G. Schiller. “Magazines for Young America: The First Hundred Years of Juvenile Periodicals.” Columbia Library Columns 23 (1974): 24-39.

A descriptive survey with inaccuracies.

• Pat Pflieger. “A Visit to Merry’s Museum; or, Social Values in a Nineteenth-Century American Periodical for Children.” PhD diss. University of Minnesota, 1987. text online

A history of the magazine, with a discussion of the social values it explored; constantly under revision. I used the entire 32-year run of the magazine, which isn’t commonly available.

• Pat Pflieger. “Robert Merry’s Museum and the Lure of the Sensational.” Paper presented at the American Culture Association conference, 1988. online

In the pages of the Museum, the only good book was a dull one.

• Pat Pflieger. “Death and the Readers of Robert Merry’s Museum.” Paper presented at the American Culture Association conference, 1994. online

Death as a subject in letters written to the Museum by its subscribers.

• Pat Pflieger. “An ‘Online Community’ of the Nineteenth Century.” Paper presented at the American Culture Association conference, 2001. online

Almost 150 years before the Internet, the letters column of Robert Merry’s Museum shaped the Merry Cousins into a virtual community. Flame wars, gender-swapping—you name it, they did it. Illustrated; with links to pieces at this site.

• Pat Pflieger, ed. Letters from Nineteenth-Century American Children to Robert Merry’s Museum Magazine. Lewiston, NY: Mellen Press, 2001.

A collection of several hundred letters from the Museum’s monthly letters column, selected for what they reveal about 19th-century American children & culture. With brief biographies of many letter-writers.

• Pat Pflieger, ed. “ ‘Dear Friend Robert Merry’: Letters from Nineteenth-Century Children.”

Letters from Nineteenth-Century American Children, edited, updated, and online.


Youth’s Medallion (1841-1842)

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger. 5 (2 July 1841): 11. Ed. Edward Otheman

We have received from the office of the Boston Mercantile Journal, a file of their Youth’s Medallion in exchange. We are much pleased with the appearance of this publication, and presume a farther examination will render us equally pleased with its character. The auspices under which it is published are a guaranty of its excellence. It is published semi-monthly, eight quarto pages in a number, at the Mercantile Journal office, Wilson’s Lane, Boston, at $1 a year for a single paper; $5 for six; $15 for twenty, all in advance.

• Review. Brother Jonathan. 2 (30 April 1842): 18. Ed. Park Benjamin & Rufus Wilmot Griswold

The Youth’s Medallion. Boston: Sleeper, Dix & Rogers.

There should be a New-York agency for this periodical, for it is one of the very best of its kind in the world. It is issued semi-monthly—printed on clear type, and handsome paper, embellished with excellent engravings, and in point of typography is unsurpassed. Uncle Christopher, the editor, makes every thing that he touches clear and interesting, not only to juveniles, but to all of any age, who are willing to learn, and ready to be profitably amused. Our children should not be without the Medallion, though its price were treble what it is.


The Young People’s Book (1841-1842)

|all notices & reviews|

• Review. The Iris, or Literary Messenger 1 (September 1841): 529. online

• Notice. The New World 3 (11 Sept 1841): 173. online

• Notice. Ladies’ Pearl 2 (May 1842): 462. Ed. Daniel Wise. online

• Notice. Brother Jonathan 1 (April 9, 1842): 409. Ed. Park Benjamin & Rufus Wilmot Griswold. online

• Review. Brother Jonathan 2 (June 4, 1842): 157. Ed. Park Benjamin & Rufus Wilmot Griswold. online

• Review. The New-York Mirror 20 (August 13, 1842): 263. Ed. Daniel Fanshawe. online


Sunday School Advocate (5 Oct 1841-31 Dec 1921)

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger 5 (6 May 1842): 90. Ed. Edward Otheman

We are pleased to greet this interesting visiter, and are delighted with its appearance and contents. It is an honor to the church and to the cause of Sabbath Schools. Though it has reached but the 14th number, it has over eleven thousand subscribers, and an increasing list. We are glad to see this extensive patronage, for as the terms are very low, its expenses can be sustained only by a large subscription; and its conductors seem willing to deny no labor or expense to render it worthy of general favor.

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger 9 (1 May 1845): 2.

• “Statistics of the Methodist Sabbath School Union, 1844-1845.” Sabbath School Messenger 9 (5 June 1845): 11.

• “The Messenger.” Sabbath School Messenger 9 (19 Feb 1846): 79-80.

• Frances E. Willard. Glimpses of Fifty Years. Chicago, IL: H. J. Smith & Co., 1889. Reproduced New York, NY: Source Book Press, 1970.


The Juvenile Wesleyan (1843-1852?)

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger 8 (20 June 1844): p. 15. Ed. Dexter S. King

The Juvenile Wesleyan.—Bro. Matlack prepares for his little friends, a nice and sprightly entertainment, twice a month, and sends it round to them in the “Juvenile Wesleyan.”

• Notice. Sabbath School Messenger 9 (1 May 1845): p. 2.

The Juvenile Wesleyan, has made its appearance again, and is welcomed in the list of our exchanges. The first number is filled with very interesting matter for our little radical friends.


The Student • The Student and Family Miscellany (1846-1855)

• Notice. Monthly Literary Miscellany, February 1853: 64. Ed. D. F. Quinby

The Student.—The January number is on our table, as neat and as valuable as ever. Fowlers & Wells, publishers, New York.—One dollar in advance.


Youth’s Monthly Visitor (1846)

• Review. The Harbinger, 2 (April 11, 1846): 283.

Youth’s Monthly Visitor. Edited and published by Mrs. M. L. Bailey. Cincinnati, Ohio. Terms, twenty-five cents a year.

We cheerfully comply with the request to notice this little paper, of which we have received a file. We had for some time been desirous to know more of the authoress of some beautiful little poems that have from time to time met our eye, and are happy to find her as the conductor of so excellent a work. The tone of the Monthly Visitor is pure and elevated; its original articles combine good taste and good sense; its selections are judicious and instructive, and, what is rare in a journal of a religious character, it is free from bigotry or narrowness without being monotonous and flat. We can heartily commend it to persons of all denominations as worthy to be put into the hands of the young. We know no publication that gives so much for so little money.


Youth’s Friend (Cincinnati, OH; 6 March 1846-Nov 1857)

• Notice. The Western Gem, and Musician 6 (June 1853): 22. Ed. Howard Durham

The Youth’s Friend is a very neat monthly, the same size of the Gem, published by Longley & Brother, our printers in Cincinnati, O. It is an excellent thing for the children, and has become very popular. Terms, 50 cts. per annum and 25 cts. to clubs.


The Boys’ and Girls’ Magazine, and Fireside Companion • Forrester’s Boys’ and Girls’ Magazine, and Fireside Companion (Jan 1848-Dec 1857)

• “Periodicals for Youth.” Sunday School Advocate 13 (Feb 11, 1854): 78.

The early period at which our paper goes to press has prevented our noticing, nearer the beginning of the year, two lively and instructive magazines for youth, which we can cheerfuly commend to those who desire periodicals containing general information and amusement.

Woodworth’s Youth’s Cabinet, published at 118 Nassau-street, New-York, ($1 00 per annum,) is now entering upon its fifth volume. It has an established character for good taste and general excellence.

Forrester’s Magazine, published by Rand, 5 Cornhill, Boston, also at $1 00 per volume, is a new comer to our table, but is already well known and highly appreciated in other quarters, especially in New-England.

Both these monthlies are well printed, and interspersed with pictures. From what we know of the editors and publishers, we are confident that the moral character of both will be found unexceptionable.

In this connection we may also mention the Youth’s Monitor, published at 200 Mulberry-street, New-York, at 25 cents per annum. Monthly numbers are sold at the counter of our Book Room at two cents each. Where monthly rewards are desired in Sunday schools, no cheap publication can be more suitable. The Monitor, as well as the Cabinet and the Magazine, makes an elevant volume at the end of the year.


The Child’s Paper (Jan 1852-1897?)

• Notice. The Youth’s Casket 3 (Dec 1854): 270.

The Child’s Paper,” is an excellent little sheet, published monthly by the American Tract Society. It is illustrated with interesting cuts, and from the style in which it is got up, and the superior excellence of its reading matter, it presents a loud claim to the attention of those who wish to do good to children. Its cost is a mere trifle, and it only needs a slight acquaintance with such a paper as this, to show how a little money can be made to do a great deal of good.


The Schoolmate (Feb 1852-Oct 1855)

• Notice. The Youth’s Casket 1 (Nov 1852): 180. Ed. Harley Thorne.

The Schoolmate.—We are much pleased with the plan of this periodical, intended as a magazine for children, and as a reading-book for schools. It[ ]is a valuable publication. It is published by George Savage, 22 John st., New York. One dollar a year.


Monday Express (in 1852)

• Notice. The Western Gem, and Musician. 4 (July 1852): 20. Ed. Howard Durham

The “Monday Express” is a weekly sheet published by J. Mitchell, jr., for the boys of Little Rock, Ark., at five cents per month. The last number wants to know why the mouth of a river is not in its head. We should like to know too.


Youth’s Banner (1852-after Feb 1853)

• Notice. Monthly Literary Miscellany, February 1853: 63-64. Ed. D. F. Quinby.

Youth’s Banner, Little Rock, Ark.—This spirited little sheet still comes to hand chuck full—so full that the Miscellany was forgotten in the last number. But we are only half mad about it, as they have persisted in saying that the cognomen of the editor was Quinly, and that we were publishing under the name of Sparks, Wood & Co. Whereas but one number was ever graced in

-----
p. 64

that way. However we can spare them for this; it is not to be expected that they can keep up with Yankee progress. But my little toddling, you must learn to speak our names plain. Talk it out right, next time. You are improving, and with a little fatherly advice occasionally, may yet do remarkably well.

• Notice. The Western Gem, and Musician 6 (May 1853): 15. Ed. Howard Durham.

THE YOUTH’S BANNER is published semi monthly, at Little Rock, Arkansas, by J. G. Mitchel[l] and W. T. Robinson. Terms, 50 cents per annum. It is devoted especially to the developement [sic] of the talent of the young.


Forest Garland (1853-1854)

• Notice. The Western Gem, and Musician 6 (July 1853): 30. Ed. Howard Durham

The Garland is a new monthly. It is a neat, spirited, and strictly moral paper, devoted to the cause of temperance among the young, and the development of youthful talent. It is decidedly the best thing of the kind that we know of, having a corps of editors who, from their enterprising spirit, have succeeded in giving life to every line of it. It is only fifty cents per annum, monthly. Address J. C. Richardson & Co., Cincinnati, O.


The Little Pilgrim (Oct 1853-Dec 1868)

• Notice. The Little Forester 1 (Feb 1854): 13.

The Little Forester has met The Little Pilgrim, from Grace Greenwood’s home in Philadelphia, and feels very much pleased with his little companion, so well, indeed, that he feels like paying him a poetical compliment.

Welcome, welcome, Little Pilgrim,

Welcome to our western land,

By our hearthstones we will greet thee

With a joyous heart and hand.

We will listen to thy stories

Of the lands beyond the sea,

To thy poesy and humor

Interwoven Gracefully.

The Little Pilgrim charges for his monthly visits, half-a-dollar a year.


The Little Wolverine (May-August 1854)

• Notice. The Youth’s Casket. 3 (June 1854): 149.

The Little Wolverine.—We have received a number of this new-comer into the ranks of juvenile literature, and hail it with the heartiest wishes for its success; not only because its editress, Mrs. C. M. Sheldon, has long been a valued friend of the Casket, but because the Little Wolverine is an excellent thing in itself. The Michigan children will feel proud of it, we are sure, and the readers of the Casket, in other parts, would be benefitted and pleased by its perusal. Published monthly, at Detroit, Mich., by Mrs. C. M. Sheldon, at 30 cents a year.


Children’s Friend (Dayton, OH; 1854-1863)

• Notice. The Youth’s Casket. 3 (June 1854): 149.

The Children’s Friend.—The children of the Buckeye state, yes, and all other states, if they please, have in this pretty, well-printed sheet, a “friend" worth having. Send on your twenty-five cent pieces, and if you are not pleased with your returns, we are greatly mistaken. Direct to S. Vonnieda, Dayton, O.


The Little-Pig Monthly (May, July 1859)

• Notice. Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine. 59 (Sept 1859): 276.

From Shepard, Clark, & Brown, Boston, through T. B. Peterson & Brothers, Philadelphia:—

AGUECHEEK. This is an extremely entertaining and well written volume of sketches of foreign travel and miscellaneous essays, the principal part of which were first given to the public in the columns of the Boston Saturday Evening Gazette, under the signature of Aguecheek. Though an invalid, their author appears to have been a patient and attentive observer of men and things, and moreover, gives evidence of a calm and unprejudiced spirit of philosophy such as few travellers seem to possess. Price $1 00.

They also send us the second number of a new magazine for the juveniles, comically entitled THE LITTLE PIG MONTHLY. It is richly illustrated, and contains much for the grave as well as for the humorous consideration of Young America. Though a child’s magazine, its funny tales and fairy stories will furnish entertainment for the entire family circle. Price 25 cents a number.


The Favourite Magazine of Instruction and Amusement for Boys and Girls • The Favorite (April-Sept 1852)

• Notice. The Western Gem, and Musician. 4 (Sept 1852): 36. Ed. Howard Durham

The Favorite, is the expressive title of a new magazine for the young, published in New York, at $1,00 per annum. It is done up in a style of exquisite mechanical beauty, and the contents will be found pleasing and beneficial to those for whom the work is intended.


Genius of Youth (1 June 1852-)

• Notice. The Western Gem, and Musician. 4 (June 1852): 12. Ed. Howard Durham

Attention, readers! By order of the society for the dissemination of a pleasing and wholesome literature, you are hereby commanded to appear immediately at your respective post offices with letters addressed to R. Alley, Olean, Ripley county, Ind.,—15¢ enclosed—with your post office addresses and names—for which you will each receive one year “The Genius of Youth,” one of the most attractive publications of the day. The editor is young, but has thrown his banner to the breeze inscribed with good principles, and since the terms of his monthly are so remarkably low it should be patronized by everybody.

• Mention. The Western Gem, and Musician. 4 (August 1852): 28. Ed. Howard Durham

W. Wallace Gurelle, Esq., a new correspondent, will write for the ‘Gem’ occasionally, in future. The ‘Genius of Youth’ contains some fine productions from his pen, both in poetry and prose. Long may he flourish.

• Notice. The Youth’s Casket. 1 (Nov 1852): 179-180. Ed. Harley Thorne.

We see that our friends out west are driving business, in the way of publishing, on their

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p. 180

’own book,’ and considering all things, they make it go very well. The “Genius of Youth,” is the title of one of their publications which we have received, and quite a pretty sheet it is; published monthly by Ross Alley, at Olean, Ia., at 15 cents a year. [Note: Actually, the Genius was published in Indiana.]


The Student and Schoolmate • The Student and Schoolmate, and Forrester’s Boy’s and Girl’s Magazine • The Student and Schoolmate • The Schoolmate (Nov 1855-1872)

• Notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, PA) 3 (Eleventh month 1868): 356. Ed. Esther K. Smedley

The Student and Schoolmate. Jos. H. Allen, editor, 203 Washington St., Boston, is ably edited, containing moral and literary matter, and instructive chapters on science.


The Youth’s Temperance Visitor (1860-after Jan 1872)

• Notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, PA) 3 (Eleventh month 1868): 356. Ed. Esther K. Smedley

A pretty little sheet—The Youth’s Temperance Visitor, by Z. Pope Vose, Rockland, Me., 50 cts, a year, is well calculated to inspire the youthful heart with a love and zeal for the principle of temperance.


Our Young Folks (1865-1873)

• John Townsend Trowbridge. “A Card from the Editor of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” St. Nicholas. 1 (Jan 1874): 160.

• Alice M. Jordan. “ ‘Our Young Folks’: Its Editors and Authors.” In From Rollo to Tom Sawyer, and Other Papers. Boston: The Horn Book, Inc., 1948.

• John Morton Blum, ed. Yesterday’s Children. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press, 1959.

Selections from Our Young Folks; includes works by prominent writers for children.

• Brandy Parris. “Difficult Sympathy in the Reconstruction-Era Animal Stories of Our Young Folks.” Children’s Literature, 31 (2003): 25-49.


Little Bouquet • Little Bouquets • Lyceum Banner • Little Bouquet (1866-after May 1873)

• Notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, PA) 3 (Eleventh month 1868): 356. Ed. Esther K. Smedley

The Lyceum Banner, by L. H. Kimball, Chicago, Ill., semi-monthly, at $1.00 per year, is also devoted to the culture, the social and moral training of youth.


The Children’s Hour (Jan 1867-June 1874)

• Notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, PA) 3 (Eleventh month 1868): 356. Ed. Esther K. Smedley

The Children’s Hour, $1.25 per year, by T. S. Arthur, Phila. The well known reputation of this author for purely moral stories for children, commend his writings to every household.


Robert Merry and admirers

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