http://www.merrycoz.org/tuttle/TUTTLE.HTM

Sarah Tuttle's Scrapbook (1834-1860s)

In 1834, Sarah Tuttle started a scrapbook which she seems to have kept until the 1860s; the date "February 12, 1834" is handwritten on the fly leaf and at least one other place in the book, and a pasted-in obituary is dated 1863. In her book, Sarah pasted poems, humorous stories, and pictures from various sources; she also recorded information on medicines. I'm not sure who Sarah was; I bought her scrapbook at a family auction in Missouri.

Unfortunately, I can't provide many scans from the scrapbook, but I'd like to record here some of what she collected.


Images from Sarah's scrapbook are featured in a wallpaper for your desktop.

[Medical remedies] [An editors' joke] ["Old Hickory & Mother Bank"] [Political conundrums, 1836]
["Going to Congress"] [Frances Trollope] [Rules for Young Ladies] ["Miss Ann Barger & Miss Abigal Seholey"]
[Two yellow birds] [Still life from two angles]

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Two lovely ladies

a fine lady Constance
(Click on image for a larger version.)

The fine lady on the left, wearing a tortoiseshell comb, appears early in the scrapbook. She seems to have been painted with watercolors, as was the basket of fruit beside her; she is a traced copy of "Constance", pasted in toward the end of the book. Constance and the young man (a suitor?) are two of many pictures from other sources which have been hand-colored, probably by Sarah. Bits of other pasted items show how efficiently Sarah used her pages.

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Medical Remedies -- Don't try these at home!

Sarah collected cures for ailments such as burns, croup, and tooth-ache, presumably for future reference. She also clipped articles recording a few "miracle" cures, including an early tracheotomy.

RECIPE FOR A COLD.--Take about four table spoonsful of good brown sugar, one spoonful of tar, and one yolk of an egg--mix them well together. For a dose take a tea spoonful on going to bed, and another on rising in the morning. If the cold is not of long standing, the patient will be relieved by continuing this course for three or four days.

A Cancer.--Mr. Thomas Tyrell, of Missouri, advertises that a cancer upon his nose, which had been treated without success by Dr. Smith, of New Haven, and the ablest surgeons in the western country, had been cured in the following manner. He was recommended to use a strong potash, made of the ashes of red oak bark boiled down to the consistence of molasses, to cover the cancer with it, and in about an hour afterwards to cover it with a plaster of tar, which must be removed after a few days, and if any protuberances remain in the wound apply more potash to them, and the plaster again, until they shall disappear, after which heal the wound with common salve. Cautery and the knife had been previously used in vain.--This treatment effected a speedy and perfect cure.--N. Y. Com. Adv.

TO PREVENT WOUNDS FROM MORTIFYING.--Sprinkle sugar on them. The Turks wash fresh wounds with wine, and sprinkle sugar on them. Obstinate ulcers may be cured with sugar dissolved in a strong decoction of walnut leaves.

Cure for a Rattlesnake Bite.--A gentleman of great intelligence, who has recently travelled much in this State, gave us a new remedy for the poison of the rattlesnake. It is the free use of saltpetre internally, as well as to the injured part. He illustrated the value of his remedy by an example. While crossing the prairie his horse was bitten; the limb and side soon became very much swollen. It was some hours before he arrived at a house, when he commenced bathing the swollen part with a strong solution of saltpetre, and gave it internally. The swelling rapidly disappeared, and the horse soon recovered. The person who proposed the remedy, said it was a sure cure. While the safest practice is no doubt to cut out the part bitten, and apply cupping glasses, or what is better, suck the wound with the mouth; this remedy is well worth remembering and trying, especially when it is too late to cut out the bitten part, as will be the case after the swelling has commenced.--Alton, Ill. Spectator.

WONDERFUL CURE.--Eleazer Chase of this town, some seven or eight years ago, in cutting stone, broke off a piece of cast steel from some of his tools that flew into one of his eyes, and caused the loss of its sight. The steel remained, which made the eye extremely susceptible of cold, and caused frequently severe inflammations, with great pain and suffering. Last winter and spring he suffered extremely, and serious fears were entertained by himself and friends that he would go off in a consumption. One alternative alone presented itself, to prevent its fatal catastrophe; and that was, to have his eye cut out--the steel that remained in, continued to irritate to that degree, and without hope from any other means, and fast declining, and continually tortured by this direful malady, he at last came to the conclusion to submit to the advice of his physician, and have this shocking operation performed.

About this time a friend of his, told him of a remedy, which was, to apply to his eye a magnet and draw out the steel. One was procured of great power and applied--the second time of application the steel came out, and relieved his eye from the irritation that had been so very severe; and he is now well and about his usual avocations, and saved the dreadful operation of having his eye dug out.--Fall Riv. Rec.

SURGICAL OPERATION.--A very intricate and scientific operation was performed on the 14th ult., on a young boy of eight years of age, of the name of Wood, residing in Mill-street, Paisley, who swallowed a tamarind stone, which entered the windpipe. The medical gentleman who was called, after consulting with two of his brethren who were sent for, proceeded to open the trachea, as the only means of saving the boy's life. The operation was a painful and delicate one, but it eventually succeeded. For several days he only breathed through the wound, but it gradually began to close, and to the surprise of many who visited him, he is now considered out of danger.--Paisly Advertiser.

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Sarah Records an Editor's Joke

In two sections of her scrapbook, Sarah pasted two versions of what is probably a joke or an urban legend; it's impossible to tell if she knew that she had included the same story twice.

Early in the scrapbook:

A TENDER-HEARTED WIFE.--A broken-hearted woman, as she calls herself--Mrs. Laura Hunt, of Broadalbin, Montgomery county, N. Y.--notifies the public, through the Amsterdam Intelligencer, that her husband, Josiah Hunt, has left her bed and board, and strayed to parts unknown; and she forbids all girls, old maids and widows, to meddle with, or marry him on penalty of the law. She also earnestly entreats all editors "through the world" to lay the foregoing information before their readers. Mrs. Hunt will please to perceive that we have complied with her request.--[Courier and Enquirer.] And we too.--[New York Transcript.] And we three.--[Cincinnati Mirror.] And we four.--[Standard.]--And we five.--[Western Methodist.] And we six.--[Zion's Herald.] And we seven.--[Maine Free Press.] And we eight.--[Mid. Free Press.] And we nine.--[Woodstock Whig.] Leave her board and bed! the villain! and we ten.--[Natl. Eagle.]--And strayed to parts unknown, the vagabond! and we eleven.--[Albany Daily Adv.] And we make up the dozen.--[New York Com. Adv.]

Not to be outdone in gallantry, and to show Mrs. Hunt how much we deprecate the base act of her worser half, in leaving "her bed and board and straying to parts unknown," we beg permission to make one towards another dozen.--[Sat. Eve. Post.]

A few pages farther along in the scrapbook, the story has added more newspapers -- and a punch line:

A TENDER-HEARTED WIFE.--A broken-hearted woman, as she calls herself--Mrs. Laura Hunt, of Broadalbin, Montgomery county, N. Y.--notifies the public, through the Amsterdam Intelligencer, that her husband, Josiah Hunt, has left her bed and board, and strayed to parts unknown; and she forbids all girls, old maids and widows, to meddle with, or marry him on penalty of the law. She also earnestly entreats all editors "through the world" to lay the foregoing information before their readers. Mrs. Hunt will please to perceive that we have complied with her request.--(Courier and Enquirer.)

And we too.--(New York Transcript.)

And we three.--(Cincinnati Mirror.)

And we four.--(Standard.)

And we five.--(Western Methodist.)

And we six.--(Zion's Herald.)

And we seven.--(Maine Free Press.)

And we eight.--(Middleton F. Press.)

And we nine.--(Woodstock Whig.)

Leave her board and bed! the villain! and we ten.--(National Eagle.)

And strayed to parts unknown, the vagabond! and we eleven.--(Albany Ad.)

And we make up the dozen.--(N. Y. Adv.)

Not to be outdone in gallantry, and to show Mrs. Hunt how much we deprecate the base act of her worser half, in leaving "her bed and board and straying to parts unknown," we beg permission to make one towards another dozen.--(Sat. Evening Post.)

Feeling ourselves as gallant as our eastern brethern, "the knights of the goose quill," we show our sympathy for the forlorn Mrs. Hunt, by making the second in the new dozen.--[Ky. Whig.]

The scoundrel! if he's in these parts, he shan't 'meddle with' our 'girls, old maids, or widows,' for we shall put them on their guard, by making the third in the new dozen.--[Maysville Monitor.]

To give the faithless Josiah additional assurance that,

"Though wander east, or wander west,
   Yet rest, he will not find it,
Until he learns the wholesome truth,
   And has the sense to mind it"--

That the prayers of heart-broken women are not made in vain--and that, however galling the matrimonial halter may be, those who voluntarily put it on, cannot slip it off without trouble--and to spread the above caution, we make four towards another dozen.--[Ky. Sentinel.]

Perhaps Josiah has bent his course towards Louisville; if so by way of caution to our "girls, old maids and widows," not to "meddle with him," we make the fifth in the second dozen.--[Louisville Advertiser.]

We comply with Mrs. Hunt's request most willingly, and thereby become sixth in the second dozen. Without intending, however, to be captious, will our Brethren of the type permit us to ask one question--what was the cause of the said Josiah's absconding?--(Missouri Intelligencer.)


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